Mathematics BSc (Hons) 2020 entry

The BSc (Hons) in Mathematics will teach you to understand complex patterns and structures, and develop the tools with which to analyse them. Whether these patterns relate to physical or biological phenomena or the structure of mathematics itself, the primary aim is to describe, categorise, and understand the processes involved.

Students of Mathematics will acquire the analytical techniques, clear logical thinking and deductive reasoning necessary to explore some of these fascinating areas of research.

Mathematics is studied up to Honours level in both the Faculty of Science (BSc) and the Faculty of Arts (MA). Students who have a background in the sciences or who wish to study Mathematics alongside science subjects at St Andrews should apply for the BSc. For those interested in studying Mathematics alongside Arts subjects, the MA in Mathematics may be of interest instead.

Students interested in the BSc degree may also be interested in the Integrated Masters courses in Mathematics, Pure Mathematics or Applied Mathematics, which allow you to graduate with a Master in Mathematics.

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UCAS code

G101

Course type

Bachelor of Science (single Honours degree)

Course duration

Four years full time

  • Start date: 7 September 2020
  • End date: 30 June 2024

If you started this programme in 2019, you can find information about 2019 entry on the 2019 Mathematics BSc page. Information about all programmes from previous years of entry can be found in the archive.

Entry requirements

These grades are the overall standards required to consider you for entry. Find out more about Standard, Minimum and Gateway entry requirements using academic entry explained and see which entry requirements you need to look at using the entry requirements indicator.

    • Standard entry grades: AAAAB, including A in Mathematics
    • Minimum entry grades: AABB, including A in Mathematics
    • Standard entry grades: A*A*A, including A* in Mathematics
    • Minimum entry grades: A*AB, including A* in Mathematics
    • Standard entry grades: 38 (HL 6,6,6), including HL6 in Mathematics
    • Minimum entry grades: 36 (HL 6,5,5), including HL6 in Mathematics

We accept a wide range of qualifications for entry on to our programmes, please see our entry requirements for more information.

For degrees combining more than one subject, the subject with the higher entry requirements determines the grades you need. You will also need to meet any further subject-specific entrance requirements as outlined on their pages.

Direct entry to second year

For the BSc degree, well-qualified school leavers may be able to apply for admission directly into the second year. Find out more about direct entry to second year for Mathematics BSc.

International applicants

If English is not your first language you will need an overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in each component (Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking), or an equivalent English Language qualification.

How to apply

Do I need to have studied this subject before?

Yes, applicants are expected to have studied Mathematics at SQA Higher, GCE A-Level, or equivalent.

Faculty entry requirements

You must also meet the Faculty of Science minimum qualifications. These vary depending on which qualifications you hold.

Other qualifications

Passes in other examinations at equivalent levels and subjects may be accepted by the Dean of the Faculty. More information on how to apply via other entry routes or accreditation of prior learning and experience can be found on the University’s entry requirements web page.

Find out more about Faculty of Science entry requirements.

Timetables

The University publishes its expected timetables before the advising process, and aims to provide each student with a personalised timetable once module choices have been made and confirmed during matriculation.

Course information

The BSc (Hons) in Mathematics is a four-year course run by the School of Mathematics and Statistics. The School also offers an MA in Mathematics, which may be more suitable for students who wish to take Mathematics alongside Arts subjects. The Mathematics element within both the BSc and MA degree programmes are exactly the same.

In the first two years, you will develop and reinforce your basic mathematical skills and refresh familiar material (e.g. complex numbers, matrices, vectors, differential equations) in preparation for more specialist study at Honours level.

Alongside Mathematics, in the first year of your studies you will be required to study up to two additional subjects. In the second year, you may choose to study Mathematics, or can carry on at least one of these subjects, sometimes two. Find out more about how academic years are organised.

At Honours level, students may select modules from a range of options on advanced and specialist specific topics. Specialist subject areas may include:

  • abstract analysis
  • fluid dynamics
  • group theory
  • history of mathematics
  • mathematical biology
  • statistical ecology
  • statistical inference.

Final year students must also complete a project on a topic chosen in consultation with teaching staff at the School of Mathematics and Statistics.

For the BSc degree, well-qualified school leavers may be able to apply for admission directly into the second year. Find out more about direct entry to second year for Mathematics BSc.

It is possible for students to take a five-year Integrated Masters course in Mathematics, Pure Mathematics or Applied Mathematics, allowing you to graduate with a Master in Mathematics.

The University of St Andrews operates on a flexible modular degree system by which degrees are obtained through the accumulation of credits. More information on the structure of the modules system can be found on the flexible degree structure webpage.

Find out more about studying Mathematics at St Andrews.

Modules

In the first two years of your degree (known as sub-honours) you will take the required modules in Mathematics alongside modules in at least one other subject in the Faculty of Science.

Typically, you will take a total of three or four modules per semester during your first two years, and four modules per semester during your third and fourth year (known as Honours). 

Find out more about the modular Scottish degree system.

Students will take between one and three first-year modules in mathematics. There is one core compulsory module, 'Mathematics', that can be studied in either semester.

  • Mathematics: introduces the ideas and techniques required for further study of mathematics or applications to other sciences.

Students who do not possess at least a B at Advanced Higher or A-Level Mathematics will need to take Introductory Mathematics in their first semester before taking the compulsory Mathematics module. This option is popular for students on different degree routes who wish to study Mathematics.

  • Introductory Mathematics: designed for students who do not meet the entry requirements for the first-year Mathematics module. Provides a secure base in elementary calculus.

First year students interested in Mathematics can also choose modules in Statistics, and in Pure and Applied Mathematics. Find a full list of first year Mathematics modules in the module catalogue.

Students will take between four and eight modules from the following selection depending on their chosen degree path.

  • Abstract Algebra: explores the key concepts of modern abstract algebra: groups, rings and fields.
  • Analysis: introduces key concepts of real analysis: limit, continuity and differentiation.
  • Combinatorics and Probability: introduces counting techniques for finite structures and the behaviour of random variables.
  • Linear Mathematics:  introduces the theory of vector spaces, linear independence, linear transformations and diagonalisation.
  • Mathematical Modelling: investigates the translation of physical problems into mathematics.
  • Multivariate Calculus: extends the techniques of calculus in a single variable to the setting of real functions of several variables.
  • Statistical Inference: introduces techniques for drawing inferences about population characteristics from observed data.
  • Vector Calculus: introduces the theory of scalar and vector fields and associated techniques for the modelling of problems arising in the physical world.

If you decide to take Mathematics in your third and fourth years, you choose from a wide variety of advanced options, including modules in complex analysis, applied statistics, symbolic computation, functional analysis and sampling theory.

Here is a sample of Honours modules which have been offered in previous years:

  • Bayesian Inference
  • Classical Mechanics
  • Fractal Geometry
  • Groups
  • Linear and Nonlinear Waves
  • Real and Abstract Analysis
  • Sampling Theory
  • Solar Theory.

In your final year, you also undertake a project on a topic chosen in consultation with the teaching staff at the School of Mathematics and Statistics. You will be required to investigate the topic, submit a report and give a presentation. 


The compulsory modules listed here must be taken in order to graduate in this subject. However, most students at St Andrews take additional modules, either in their primary subject or from other subjects they are interested in. For Honours-level, students choose from a range of Honours modules, some of which are listed above. A full list of all modules available for the current academic year can be found in the module catalogue.

Teaching

Teaching format

In first year, teaching for each module centres on a daily lecture (100 to 250 students) and a weekly small group tutorial (8 to 12 students) where students undertake exercises and discuss each week’s topics. In addition, computer labs (25 to 60 students) are held once a week for each module to assist with both computing and problem-solving skills.

In second year, each module typically comprises five lectures (100 to 250 students), one tutorial (8 to 12 students), one computer lab (25 to 60 students), and one examples class (25 to 60 students) per fortnight.

You will develop increasing independence and initiative as you progress through your degree programme so that by third and fourth year the average teaching load drops to around ten hours of lectures and four tutorials per week, supplemented by private study.

When not attending lectures, tutorials and computer labs, you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. Typically, this will involve:

  • preparing coursework assignments
  • working on individual and group projects
  • undertaking research in the library
  • preparing for examinations.

You will be taught by an experienced teaching team with expertise and knowledge of Mathematics and Statistics. Postgraduate research students who have undertaken teacher training may also contribute to the teaching of tutorials, examples classes and computing classes under the supervision of the module leader.

You can find contact information for all Mathematics staff on the School of Mathematics and Statistics website.

In addition to your studies in the School of Mathematics and Statistics, optional academic support is available through practical study skills courses and workshops hosted within the University.

The University’s student services team can help students with additional needs resulting from disabilities, long term medical conditions or learning disabilities. More information can be found on the students with disabilities webpage.

Assessment

Progress is monitored through tutorial assignments, and sub-honours modules are assessed by a balanced combination of coursework and written exams. At Honours level, modules may be assessed by written examination alone or a combination of written examination and coursework.

Examinations are held at the end of each semester during a dedicated exam diet with revision time provided beforehand.

The School aims to provide feedback on every assessment within three weeks to help you improve on future assessments.

Undergraduates at the University of St Andrews must achieve at least 7.0 on the St Andrews 20-point grade scale to pass a module. To gain access to Honours-level modules, students must achieve the relevant requisites as specified in the policy on entry to Honours and in the relevant programme requirements. Please note that some Schools offer qualified entry to Honours, and this will be clearly specified in the programme requirements. To find out the classification equivalent of points, please visit the common reporting scale webpage.

Visit St Andrews

If you are interested in studying at St Andrews, join us at a visiting day to explore the town, find out about our courses and meet current students.

Undergraduates

Upcoming visiting days:

  • Wednesday 25 September 2019
  • Wednesday 2 October 2019
  • Wednesday 16 October 2019
  • Wednesday 23 October 2019
  • Wednesday 30 October 2019

Fees

Tuition fees for 2020 entry

Scotland and EU Tuition fees for Scottish and EU applicants have yet to be set for 2020 entry.
Rest of the UK Tuition fees for applicants from the rest of the UK have yet to be set for 2020 entry.
Overseas £23,910

For overseas students, tuition fees will be fixed at this level for the duration of your programme.

More information on tuition fees can be found on the undergraduate fees and funding page.

Accommodation fees

Find out about accommodation fees for University accommodation.

Funding and scholarships

The University of St Andrews offers a number of scholarships and support packages to undergraduate students each year.

Find out more about undergraduate scholarships.

Joint Honours degrees

You can take Mathematics BSc as part of a joint Honours degree alongside one of the following subjects.

Additional joint degree options are available for students who take the MA in Mathematics

"With" degrees

You can take the Mathematics BSc as part of a "with" Honours degree in which the majority of the course deals with the first named subject. St Andrews offers the following "with" degree for Mathematics:

Your future

Careers

The demand for mathematically trained graduates exceeds the supply, and therefore the career prospects for graduates in Mathematics from St Andrews are excellent in a variety of fields. Clear logical thinking, deductive reasoning, confidence in data handling, and IT skills are attributes that are highly prized by employers.

Over 50% of Mathematics graduates gain employment with: 

  • computer consultancies
  • financial services organisations (for example, Goldman Sachs, KPMG, and PwC)
  • industry
  • insurance companies
  • merchant banks
  • the civil service.

The Careers Centre offers one-to-one advice to all students as well as a programme of events to assist students to build their employability skills.

Study abroad

Mathematics students may participate in the University-wide St Andrews Abroad programme. For information about study abroad options, please see the Study Abroad site.

Student life

From the outset, the University of St Andrews offers an array of events and opportunities which result in a truly unique student experience. Students participate in a range of traditions, notably, the red academic gown and the academic family, where older students adopt first year students as ‘children’ and help guide them in a system of mentoring. These traditions and the choice of over 150 sports clubs and student societies to choose from ensures a community feel amongst students from first year onwards.

Students of Mathematics may be interested in joining the Mathematics Society (SUMS), a society dedicated to bringing people together who are interested in maths. They hold regular socials and informative talks from guest speakers.

The School of Mathematics and Statistics is currently split between two sites – the Mathematical Institute on the North Haugh and the Scott Lang Building at the Observatory. Most of the Statistics staff and research students can be found at the Observatory.

The town of St Andrews itself has lots to offer. As University buildings are located throughout the town, walking around you encounter ancient and modern buildings and areas of greenery and seaside which provide a rich, beautiful backdrop to learning. If you want a change of scenery, St Andrews' position near surrounding towns and cities such as Anstruther, Dundee and Edinburgh make it ideal for getting to know more about Scotland.

Find out more about student life at the University of St Andrews.

Contact information

School of Mathematics and Statistics
University of St Andrews
Mathematical Institute
North Haugh
St Andrews
KY16 9SS

Phone: +44 (0)1334 46 3744 
Email: maths-admissions@st-andrews.ac.uk

Mathematics and Statistics website

Policies

Admission to the University of St Andrews is governed by our admissions policy.

Curriculum development

As a research intensive institution, the University ensures that its teaching references the research interests of its staff, which may change from time to time. As a result, programmes are regularly reviewed with the aim of enhancing students' learning experience. Our approach to course revision is described online (PDF, 72 KB).

Tuition fees

The University will clarify compulsory fees and charges it requires any student to pay at the time of offer. The offer will also clarify conditions for any variation of fees. The University’s approach to fee setting is described online (PDF, 84 KB).