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Phenol - First Aid Guidance

Contents

   1. Introduction
   2. Guidance on emergency actions to be taken in the event of direct contact with phenol
   3. First Aid - Skin Contact
   4. First Aid - Eye Contact
   5. Notes for Ambulance Staff / Hospital Staff

Introduction

This guidance is for your protection and you should read it before using phenol and show it to any First Aider / Ambulance Staff / Hospital Staff if you have direct contact with phenol

Guidance on emergency actions to be taken in the event of direct contact with phenol

Phenol is extremely poisonous and corrosive. It can be absorbed across intact skin. As it initially may have anaesthetic effects, the phenol may cause extensive tissue damage before the casualty feels any pain.

In the event of direct contact with phenol, the casualty must be sent immediately to the Accident and Emergency Unit of Ninewells Hospital, Dundee.

N.B. - A copy of this guidance should accompany the casualty

First Aid - Skin Contact

  1. Remove any contaminated clothing immediately. Wear appropriate protective gloves to avoid further contamination or injury to first aider.
  2. Flush the affected skin area with copious amounts of water for a minimum of 15 minutes to remove any phenol which may be lying on the surface of the skin (not yet absorbed).
  3. After the initial irrigation with water, apply Polyethylene Glycol (Molecular Weight 300) commonly called PEG300 or Macrogol 300 for at least 30 minutes or until the casualty receives treatment at the A&E Unit of Ninewells Hospital.

First Aid - Eye Contact

In the event of eye contact there will be severe pain and redness. Irrigate the affected eye with copious amounts of running water and send to the Accident and Emergency Unit of Ninewells Hospital, Dundee immediately.

DO  NOT  USE  ON  THE  EYE

Macrogol,

commonly known as

PEG 300 OR MACROGOL 300

Notes for Ambulance Staff / Hospital Staff

NOTE:  Do  Not  Touch  Affected  Tissue  With  Bare  Hands

Patients with corneal ulceration should be referred immediately for an examination by an opthalmological examination / assessment.

Phenol is absorbed through intact skin and this may cause symptoms similar to those observed from inhalation and ingestion of phenol. Ployethylene Glycol molecular weight 300 inactivates any phenol absorbed. Inhalation of phenol may cause pulmonary oedema for which positive pressure ventilation should be used.

Possible complications of phenol absorbtion include cardiogenic shock, hyperpyrexia, gut perforation and renal failure.

Contact

Environmental Health and Safety Services contact details

University of St Andrews
Bute Building Queens Terrace
St Andrews
Fife
KY16 9TS
Scotland, United Kingdom

Tel: +44 (0)1334 462750
Fax:44 (0)1334 462747