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People

Academic Staff

Name Institution E-mail
Dr. P. Wahl University of St Andrews  
Professor J.C.S. Davis University of St Andrews/Cornell University  
Professor. A.G. Green University College London  
Dr C.A. Hooley University of St Andrews  
Professor A.D. Huxley University of Edinburgh  
Dr. J.M.J. Keeling University of St Andrews  
Dr. P.D. King University of St Andrews  
Professor S.L. Lee University of St Andrews  
Professor A.P. Mackenzie University of St Andrews/MPI Dresden
Professor S.H. Simon University of Oxford  

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Postdoctoral Staff

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Name Institution E-mail
Dr Kyle Ballantine  University of St Andrews  
Dr Thorsten Wahl  University of Oxford  
Dr Chi Ming Yim  University of St Andrews  

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Administrative Staff

Name Institution E-mail
Sarah Webster - Programme Grant Administrator University of St Andrews  

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P Wahl

Dr Peter Wahl

TOPNES Management Group

University of St Andrews

Peter Wahl's expertise is in the study of strongly correlated electron systems at surfaces by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. He has studied many body effects both in model systems, which consist of one or a few magnetic atoms on a metal surface, as well as bulk correlated electron materials. The aim is to establish an understanding of the rich physics found in strongly correlated electron materials, thereby making them more amenable to applications.


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JCSDavis

Prof. Séamus Davis

TOPNES Management Group

University of St Andrews/Cornell University

Professor Séamus Davis of Cornell University, Brookhaven National Laboratory and the University of St Andrews is a world leader in the physics of superfluid 3HE and scanning tunneling spectroscopy, both of which are of high relevance to this Programme. He is a recipient of two major international prizes - the 2005 Fritz London Prize and the 2009 Kamerlingh Onnes Prize - and was elected to the US National Academy of Sciences in 2010.
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AGGreen

Prof. Andrew Green

TOPNES Management Group

University College London

Prof. Andrew Green is Chair in Theoretical Physics at the London Centre for Nanotechnology. His research interests focus on various aspects of quantum criticality; the formation of novel correlated electron phases, the behaviour of quantum critical systems when driven out of equilibrium, and the formation of novel correlated electron phases. He has been working with other TOPNES theorists to explore the interface between field theories of condensed matter systems, tensor networks and holography. He was Miller Visiting Professor at UC Berkeley in 2008, working with our Programme collaborator Prof. Joel Moore, and was the recipient in 2010 of an EPSRC Leadership Fellowship.

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CAHooley

Dr. Chris Hooley

TOPNES Management Group

University of St Andrews

Dr. Chris Hooley is a Senior Lecturer in Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics at the University of St Andrews, and Operations Director of the EPSRC-funded Scottish Doctoral Training Centre in Condensed Matter Physics. His research interests centre on the quantum many-body problem and its applications in the physics of strongly correlated electrons in crystalline solids, cold atomic gases, and nanoscale devices.

His active research topics at the moment are: quantum quenches in ultracold atomic gases (with his students Max Schulz and Scott Taylor); quantum Kasteleyn transitions in spin-ice materials; the physics of Landau damping in nearly ferromagnetic metals (with his student Sam Ridgway); the use of matrix product states to describe strongly correlated electron systems; vortex-mediated melting in layered systems with competing orders; the interpretation of partition function zeros at complex temperature; Majorana-paired mean-field states in magnetic systems; lineshapes of the Kondo effect in scanning tunnelling microscope experiments; and soliton solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell-Dirac equations (with his student Alasdair Leggat).  He also has research interests in the out-of-equilibrium Kondo model, and in magnetostrictive effects, including the Invar phenomenon.

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ADHuxley

Prof. Andrew Huxley

TOPNES Management Group

University of Edinburgh

Professor Andrew Huxley has broad experience in low temperature physics, neutron scattering and materials physics. He is particularly known for his work on superconductivity in itinerant ferromagnets, especially the phenomenon of re-entrance at high magnetic field. Prof Huxley's research is into quantum states formed from strongly correlated electrons. Such states include superconductivity, different forms of magnetism, modulated or reduced symmetry electronic structures and topological states.  This research includes synthesis of high purity crystals, and the development and use of low-temperature laboratory based apparatus and central facility experiments to elucidate how such states may be brought about and to guide the discovery of new materials and, potentially, new types of state. Since moving from Grenoble to Edinburgh in 2006 he has established major laboratories in Edinburgh and St Andrews with funding from EPSRC and the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA), and has held a Royal Society-Wolfson Research Merit Award.
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JMJKeeling

Dr. Jonathan Keeling

TOPNES Management Group

University of St Andrews

My work focuses on driven, dissipative many body quantum systems, and on understanding non-equilibrium states of such systems.  In particular, I work on a variety of coupled matter-light systems, from exciton-polaritons, to cold atoms in optical cavities, to superconducting qubits in microwave cavities.  In all these systems, my aim is to characterise the collective behaviour that can energy, and to understand how the presence of drive and dissipation modifies that behaviour.  This includes exploring superfluidity in polariton condensates, understanding phase transitions in dissipative arrays of coupled microwave cavities, modelling photon condensates (formed in dye-filled optical cavities), and looking for collective behaviour of cold atoms in optical cavities.
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Phil King

Dr Phil King

TOPNES Management Group

University of St Andrews

Dr. Phil King is a Royal Society University Research Fellow and Lecturer in Physics at the University of St Andrews. His research is focused on using angle-resolved photoemission to investigate strongly-correlated electron systems, emerging semiconductors, and topological insulators. He has been awarded several prizes and competitive fellowships including the Gerhard Ertl Young Investigator Award and a Kavli Fellowship at Cornell University.
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Steve Lee

Prof. Steve Lee

TOPNES Management Group

University of St Andrews

Steve Lee makes extensive use of central facilities, including neutron, muon and synchrotron sources, to study problems in condensed matter that range from the fundamental through to the applied. His research interests frequently involve working closely with chemists and materials scientists, often involving mesoscopic and nanometric confinement to tailor new properties. Recent examples include nanomagnetic recording media, vortex matter, nanocolloids, electronic properties of complex oxides, modification of organo-metallic interfaces, phase transitions in lithographically defined metamaterials and superconducting spin-valves. His current interest is in the generation and manipulation of spin-triplet correlations in hybrid magnetic-superconducting systems. He is a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and of the Institute of Physics.
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APMackenzie

Prof. Andy Mackenzie

TOPNES Management Group

MPI Dresden

Prof Andy Mackenzie's experience is in the experimental study of strongly correlated electron systems and unconventional superconductors, for which he has been awarded the 2004 Daiwa-Adrian Prize and 2011 Mott Medal and Prize. His research interests concern the behaviour of solids in which the independent electron approximation breaks down, and the motion of any one charge carrier is said to be strongly correlated with that of all the others. He is holder of a Royal Society - Wolfson Research Merit Award, and previously, Director of the Scottish Doctoral Training Centre in Condensed Matter Physics.
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SHSimon

Prof. Steve Simon

TOPNES Management Group

University of Oxford

Formerly a department director at Bell Laboratories, Professor Steve Simon of the University of Oxford has a strong research background in quantum information, wireless communications, semiconductor physics, fractional quantum Hall effect and topological quantum computation. His current research focus is on the topological phases of matter. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and currently holds a Royal Society Wolfson Merit Award.
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Kyle Ballantine

Dr Kyle Ballantine

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

University of St Andrews

Kyle joined TOPNES in October 2015. Working with Dr. Jonathan Keeling, his research focuses on theories of artificial gauge fields in ultracold atom systems. These fields act on neutral atoms to simulate the effect of a magnetic field.

Kyle was born in Ireland, and obtained his degree in Theoretical Physics from Trinity College Dublin in 2010. Following this he completed an MSc in optical design of plasmonic elements. Kyle's PhD, also completed at Trinity College Dublin, focused on topological classification of optical systems, particularly for the case of inhomogeneous polarisation. He has also worked on topics including optical angular momentum, hyperbolic metamaterials and conical diffraction.
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Jiagui Feng

Dr Jiagui Feng

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

University of St Andrews

Jiagui Feng obtained his PhD degree from the Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2013. He joined the University of St Andrews as a postdoc recently. His research is focused on designing low dimensional structures with functional materials by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and investigating their emerging phenomena with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES).
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Thorsten Wahl

Dr Thorsten Wahl

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

University of Oxford

Thorsten uses Tensor Network States to tackle various problems in Condensed Matter Physics: The complexity of calculating the ground state of a quantum-many body problem generally scales exponentially with the number of particles. This makes the exact calculation of the ground states of Condensed Matter systems a completely hopeless enterprise, which necessitates the use of efficient approximation schemes. Tensor Network States are one of them. They are non-perturbative and do not suffer from the so-called sign problem, i.e., can be applied to fermionic and frustrated systems as well. For a given accuracy as compared to the real ground state, they require only a polynomial number of parameters, which makes the quantum many-body problem - in principle - accessible for conventional computers. Contrary to previous convictions, Thorsten has demonstrated that they can also describe Quantum Hall systems and is now working on their application to such systems in a realistic setting. Furthermore, he works on the use of Tensor Network States for Lattice Gauge Theories, where they present an unprecedented approach, as they can also be employed in the presence of both fermionic matter and strong interactions. Moreover, he is currently exploring the optimal use of Tensor Network States for the calculation of the ground and excited states of many-body localised systems and the excitation spectra of translationally invariant one dimensional quantum spin chains.

Thorsten was born in Ludwigsburg, Germany. He studied physics at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, from 2006 to 2010 (diploma). In 2009/10 he did the research required for his diploma thesis at the University of Cambridge in the group of Richard Needs. Thereafter, he joined the group of Ignacio Cirac at the Max-Planck Institute of Quantum Optics in Garching, Germany, for his doctorate. During his PhD, he mainly worked on the application of Tensor Network States to Quantum Hall systems, but also used them to characterise all translationally invariant one dimensional quantum spin systems with long-range localisable entanglement. In October 2015, he started working in the group of Steve Simon at the Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics at Oxford.
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Chi Ming Yim

Dr Chi Ming Yim

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

University of St Andrews

Chi Ming joined TOPNES in May 2016. Working with Dr. Peter Wahl, his research is concentrated on the investigation of the magnetic orders at the atomic scale in unconventional superconductors using cutting-edge spin-polarized scanning tunneling spectroscopy.

Chi Ming was born in Hong Kong. He obtained his bachelor degree in Physics from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in 2005, and MPhil degree in Physics from the same institute in 2007. In his MPhil project, he worked in Prof. Michael Altmanís group to investigate the diffusion behaviour of CO molecules on the Pt(111) surface using low energy electron microscope. Later, he joined Prof. Geoff Thorntonís group at University College London to pursue his PhD degree, studying the electronic and chemical properties of the TiO2 surfaces using low temperature scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). After obtaining his doctoral degree in 2012, Chi Ming continued his research in Thornton group, investigating molecular adsorption on supported metal nanoparticles using both STM and synchrotron radiation facilities, as well as the electronic structures of atomic-scale metal clusters supported on TiO2 using scanning tunnelling spectroscopy.
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