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Health and safety policy for student placement

Index 

 

  1. Health and Safety Policy for Student Placement
  2. Placement Procedure

 

Appendices

 

  1. Appendix 1a- Example Letter (Initial Letter)
  2. Appendix 1b - Example Letter (Renewal letter)
  3. Appendix 2 - Placement Health and Safety Checklist
  4. Appendix 3 - Record of Dates
  5. Appendix 4 - Letter to Student
  6. Appendix 5 - Guidance Notes for Students on Placements (Health and safety)
  7. Appendix 6 -  Student Induction Checklist
  8. Appendix 7 - Guidance for Assessment of Placements (Health and Safety)

1.   HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY FOR STUDENT PLACEMENT

 

This Policy covers student work placements within industry and commerce etc. in the United Kingdom and should be complied with by relevant Schools/Units.

 

The University of St. Andrews adheres to CVCP guidance on this matter and accepts that:

 

  1. While the primary responsibility for meeting the statutory health and safety requirements within a placement remains with the employer, the University has both a legal and a moral responsibility to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health and safety of students on placement.
  2. The University will put in place procedures for the placement students and set appropriate health safety and welfare standards.
  3. Written records will be kept of each stage of the placement procedure.
  4. Schools/Units will ensure that, staff who are delegated student placement duties, are advised to take reasonable care of themselves and of other people who may be affected by their acts or omissions at work.
  5. Schools/Units will ensure, where necessary through the provision of appropriate training, that staff are competent to perform their delegated health and safety duties in accordance with statutory requirements and any other relevant guidance.

 

All relevant Schools/Units should hold a copy of the CVCP guidance booklet entitled "Health and Safety Guidance for the Placement of HE Students"

 

It is expected that Heads of Schools/Units will ensure that all relevant members of staff are made aware of the above CVCP guidance and of this Policy and that they will also ensure that the following placement procedures are implemented.

 

2.   PLACEMENT PROCEDURE

 

The following sets out the steps to be taken and identifies who should normally initiate each action.

 

  • Appointment of Placement Organisers- Heads of Schools/Units should appoint appropriately qualified members of staff to act as Placement Organisers. Placement Organisers for graduate student placements (CASE and the like) will normally be the student's Academic Supervisor.

    In all dealings with placement companies Placement Organisers, and other members of staff, should carry out their duties with tact and diplomacy, appropriate to the circumstances, thereby helping to promote the very best of relationships.

 

  • Placement found - Action initiated by Student, School or Unit.

    The Placement Organiser will inform the student(s), in writing, that they may not start work until they have received a document so authorising them.

 

 

  • Preliminary enquiries- The Placement Organiser will enter into discussions with the Employer/Manager concerning the objectives of the placement, the implications of accepting students into the workplace and the purpose and use of the "Placement Health and Safety Checklist".

     

    In the case of a large company these discussions may be held with the most appropriate officer of the company e.g. the Manager in overall control of employees in the student(s) work area(s).

     

    Whenever practicable these discussions should take place at the workplace giving the Placement Organiser an opportunity to check the employer's management system for ensuring occupational health, safety and welfare. The Organiser will carryout an assessment of the placement, using a checklist to ensure that conditions meet appropriate standards with respect to health, safety and welfare (see Appendix 7)

     

  • Employer contacted re: health and safety - The Placement Organiser will send an appropriately modified version of an example letter (see Appendix 1b), along with a copy of the standard Check List (Appendix 2) to the Employer/Manager.

     

    The Placement Organiser will, on receipt of the completed document, assess the answers.

     

    In the event of a "Yes" response to every question in the Check List the placement may normally be approved.

     

    In the event of a "No" response to any question guidance and/or assistance should be sought from the Safety Adviser who will, when necessary, carry out an appropriate investigation and inform the Organiser in writing, whether or not, in his judgment, the placement should proceed.

     

  • Record of placement - The Placement Organiser will enrol student(s) and record relevant details of the placement in an appropriate form (Appendix 3).

 

  • Approval of placement given to student - The Placement Organiser will supply the student with a letter of authority to start placement (see Appendix 4) along with a copy of the following documents, "Guidance Notes for Students on Placements Health and Safety" and "Student Induction Checklist" (see Appendices 5 and 6) .

 

  • Health and safety briefing - The Placement Organiser will provide or arrange an appropriate health and safety briefing and advise student(s) that attendance is compulsory.

     

    At the briefing the student(s) should be informed that they will be treated by the employer as employees of the company and that as such they have legal duties including:

     

     

    • taking reasonable care of their own health and safety and that of others who may be affected by what they do or do not do;

       

       

    • co-operating with the employer on health and safety;

       

       

    • not interfering with or misusing anything provided for their health, safety and welfare.

     

    The briefing should include guidance on foreseeable risks and should also include the instruction that where there is a significant change of location the student must notify the Organiser. The student(s) should also be advised to expect health and safety instruction and training from the placement employer.

     

    The Organiser will keep a record of attendance and the content of the briefing.

     

  • Placement visits- An Academic Monitor will visit the student(s) in the workplace, at an appropriate frequency, during the placement. A degree of judgement is required when setting the frequency of such visits and account should be taken of factors including the foreseeable level of risk, the duration of placement and any feedback received from the student(s) or others.

     

    Note: Only in the case of low-risk placements, lasting only a few weeks, may such a visit be omitted.

     

  • Academic Monitor - The Academic Monitor will discuss health and safety matters in the workplace with the student.

     

    In the event that the Placement Organiser has not visited and carried out an assessment, prior to the commencement of the placement, the Academic Monitor will, using the guidance provided, assess the general conditions in the areas where the student(s) is working(see Appendix 7). If, in the judgement of the Academic Monitor, the student is exposed to significant risk(s) the Academic Monitor will take appropriate action.

     

     

  • Debriefing - The Placement Organiser will, at the conclusion of a placement, hold a debriefing session with the student(s) to find out about any health and safety problems.

     

    Note: Only one sequence is necessary, no matter how many students are employed, but the sequence will begin again after twelve months if the employer is to continue to be approved for placement.


Appendix 1a - Example Letter for Student Placement (Initial letter)

(A copy of this letter can be downloaded as a Microsoft Word '97 document  - Placement of Students App 1a (RTF, 5 KB))

STUDENT PLACEMENT

 

Our Ref: Date:

Period of Placement: Start Date:

 

Dear .......................................

 

Health and Safety of Students on Placement (CASE Studentships)

(Name of student(s) to be added if appropriate)

(Once again) the School of ................ is grateful that your company (Naming it) has agreed to participate in our  (Industrial) Placement Scheme (To enter into a CASE/collaborative research agreement with the University) and we look forward to a a (continuing) happy and fruitful partnership between our two organisations. I am sorry to burden you with an additional task at this stage, but I hope that you will understand the reasons which lie behind the present request.

The University has been legally advised the the 'Duty of Care' which it owes to each matriculated student extends to periods when the student's coursework is undertaken outwith the University premises. The (United Kingdom) Health and Safety Executive has recommended that the University ask  formally for assurances regarding the provision made by your organisation for the student's (students') health and safety while he (she/they) is (are) undertaking placement (carrying out research) with your company. The University would be grateful, therefore, if you could complete and return the enclosed checklist or alternatively, if you would pass it on to your organisation's Health and Safety manager for attention. The completed document should be returned to me.

Whereas we have been very happy in the past with (we have no reason to doubt) the quality of the training and experience which has provided (will provide) for our students, the University authorities are now obviously anxious to protect themselves against possible litigation in the event of an accident to a student on placement, and they have instructed us that no student should commence work at your premises until formal assurances on health and safety have been received.

For our part, we, in the School ........................................ shall do all we can to ensure that each student is aware of his/her responsibilities in Health and Safety matters before he/she comes to begin work with you. We undertake that a member of the University staff (the Academic Monitor) (the Research Supervisor) (Naming the individual) will visit the site twice (or however many times are agreed) according to the normal (previously) agreed timetable. Health and Safety issues can be discussed during these visits if necessary, and you are, of course, at liberty to raise any concerns with the School or with the University safety Office at any time.

 

I apologise again for any inconvenience which this latter may cause to you or your colleagues, but I hope that you will understand why it has been necessary. I look forward to hearing from you.

 

Yours sincerely

 

 

....................................

 

--------------------------------------o0o-----------------------------------

Appendix 1b - - Example Letter for Student Placement (Renewal letter)

(A copy of this letter can be downloaded as a Microsoft Word '97 document  - Placement of Students App 1b (RTF, 3 KB))

 

Dear ...........................

 

Health and Safety of Students on Placement (CASE Studentships)

 

Once again the School .......................................... is grateful that your company (Naming it) has agreed to participate in our Industrial Placement Scheme (to continue/renew a CASE / collaborative research arrangement with the University) and we look forward to continuing a happy and fruitful partnership between our two organisations.

 

Last year (or whenever it was) you were kind enough to complete and return a Health and safety Checklist in respect of Placement students. A photocopy of that return is enclosed for your convenience; I should be grateful if you would sign and return the renewal form to me, noting any necessary alterations. I am sorry to remind you that, as previous years, the University authorities have instructed us that students may not commence work at your premises until formal assurances on your current health and safety regulations have been received.

 

I look forward to hearing from you.

 

Yours sincerely


Appendix 2

(A copy of this form can be downloaded as a Microsoft Word '97 document  - Placement of Students App 2 (RTF, 17 KB))

 

UNIVERSITY OF ST. ANDREWS

PLACEMENT HEALTH AND SAFETY CHECKLIST

Name of employer .........................................................Tel: ....................... Fax .....................

Address .................................................................................................. e-mail .....................

 

.   Yes   No    
1.   Do you have a written Health and Safety policy?    
2. Do you have a policy regarding health and safety training for people working in your undertaking, including use of vehicles, plant and equipment, and will you provide all necessary health and safety training for the placement student?    
3. a).   Is the organisation registered with the Health and Safety Executive?    
  b).   The Local Authority Environmental Health Department?    
4. Insurance    
  a - Is Employer and Public Liability Insurance held?    
  b - Will your insurances cover any liability incurred by a placement student as a result of his/her duties as an employee?    
5. Risk Assessment    
  a - Have you carried out risk assessment of your work practices to identify possible risks whether to your own employees or to others within your undertaking?    
  b - Are risk assessments kept under regular review?    
  c - Are the results of risk assessment implemented?    
6. Accidents and Incidents    
  a - Is there a formal procedure for reporting and recording accidents and incidents in accordance with Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR)?    
  b - Have you procedures to be followed in the event of serious and imminent danger to people at work in your undertaking?    
  c - Will you report to the university all recorded accidents involving placement students?    
  d - Will you report to the university any sickness involving placement students which may be attributable to the work?    

 

Contact Personnel

Who is your nominated contact for compliance with the requirements of health and safety legislation?

Name and position..................................................................................................................................

Tel: ................................................. Fax ........................................... e-mail .........................................

The above statements are true to the best of my knowledge and belief.

Signed:.............................................................. Date...................................

Position .....................................................(Employer/Manager responsible for students' workplace(s))

 

Thank you for completing the questionnaire. Please return it as soon as possible to:

 

(PlacementOrganiser) ..................................................................................................................

(School/Unit) ...............................................................................................................................

(Address) ....................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................


Appendix 3 - Record of Dates

(A copy of this form can be downloaded as a Microsoft Word '97 document  -Placement of Students App 3 (RTF, 15 KB))

UNIVERSITY OF ST.ANDREWS

 

RECORD OF DATES

 

Course:

 

No Student           Attended

H&S

Briefing

H & S

Pack

Received

Placement

Confirmed

Placement

Documents

sent to

student

Letter

sent

to

employer

Reply

from

employer

Further

Action

Authority

sent to

student

Enrolment

authorised

. . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .
. .   . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .   . .
. . .. . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .
.. . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .

 

This record sheet should be held and maintained by the Placement Organiser


Appendix 4 - Letter to Student

(A copy of this form can be downloaded as a Microsoft Word '97 document  -Placement of Students App 4 (RTF, 5 KB))

UNIVERSITY OF ST. ANDREWS

 

LETTER TO STUDENT

 

Name.........................................................................................................................

 

Course Title............................................................................................................

 

Placement .................................................(Dates)

 

Authority to Start Placement

This authority enables you to begin your placement immediately, or on the date agreed with your employer, whichever is the later.

It is valid for the whole of your employment with the employer named below, unless circumstances change sufficiently to warrant its withdrawal.

This authority is valid for employment with:

 

Employer's name ....................................................................................................

 

Attended health and safety briefing  -   Date...........................

Received health and safety pack  -  Date...........................

Received placement pack  -  Date............................

 

Authorised: .....................................................   Date...............................

(Placement Organiser)

 

Authorised: ......................................................   Date .............................

(University Safety Adviser when appropriate)

 

N.B. Before starting work you should have read the information provided in the health and safety pack, particularly the section " Guidance Notes for Students on Placements (Health and Safety)".


Appendix 5 - Guidance Notes for Students on Placements

(A copy of this  checklist can be downloaded as a Microsoft Word '97 document  -Placement of Students App 5 (RTF, 27 KB))

 

UNIVERSITY OF ST.ANDREWS

 

GUIDANCE NOTES FOR STUDENTS ON PLACEMENTS

(HEALTH AND SAFETY)

 

ACTION TO BE TAKEN IN AN EMERGENCY

Information for students on placements

Because of the wide variety of work which is carried out and the possible complex layout of the various buildings it is not possible to produce a set of valid and detailed emergency instructions to cover every situation which may arise. For this reason each employer has its own emergency instructions relating to particular buildings. There should be in every building a notice setting out the procedure to be adopted in case of fire.

This instruction should be studied and committed to memory.

There are certain points which apply to all emergency situations:

 

  • You should commit to memory the standing orders for emergency action. You will have no time to read them in an emergency;
  • Remember, you are expected to act in the spirit of the instructions. There is no substitute for common sense;
  • The most important consideration at all times is human safety;
  • Remember, if you become a casualty someone must rescue you, possibly at personal risk to themselves;
  • You should act quietly and methodically. You should not rush or attempt to pass others when leaving the scene of an emergency;
  • The senior person present should assume control of the situation, ensuring the safe evacuation from the premises of all persons present and be prepared to warn the Emergency Services, etc, of known specific hazards;

If you have to telephone for assistance in an emergency, the following information must always be given:

 

  1. Who you are;
  2. Where you are: the location and telephone extension from which you are telephoning;
  3. The nature of the emergency and what services are required;
  4. The exact location where assistance is required. You should ensure that the message has been correctly received by asking for it to be repeated back to you;

 

It is essential that the location is clearly defined. Local terminology should not be used because for instance, "the research site" means very little to the Emergency Services.

It is important always to give the correct name for the building and the street where it is located, if the post code is known that should also be provided.

 

THE HEALTH AND SAFETY AT WORK ACT 1974 (HASWA)

The Act is based upon the concept of a general duty of care for most people associated with work activities, and the specific aims are to:-

 

  • secure the health, safety and welfare of persons at work;
  • protect persons other than persons at work against risks to health or safety arising out of, or in connection with, the activities of persons at work;
  • control the keeping and use of explosive or highly flammable or otherwise dangerous substances, and generally prevent the unlawful acquisition, possession and use of such substances;
  • control the emission into the atmosphere of noxious or offensive substances.

The main provisions of HASAW as applicable to people, are to place various duties upon employers, employees and others. In brief, these are:

 

1.    General duties of employers

 

Employers are required, as far as reasonably practicable, to:

 

  • ensure the health and safety and welfare of employees;
  • provide safe plant and systems of work;
  • ensure safe use, handling, storage and transport of articles and substances;
  • provide information, instruction, training and supervision;
  • maintain a safe place of work and safe means of access and egress.

 

2.    General duties of employers to employees

 

The effect is to make criminally enforceable the common law duty to take reasonable care for the safety of employees. This includes the requirement, as far as reasonably practicable, to:

 

  • ensure employees know the risks;
  • ensure employees know the precautions;
  • ensure the precautions are available;
  • ensure employees know the precautions available.

 

3.    General duties of employers to persons other than employees

 

Employers have a general duty to protect anyone affected by the undertaking, e.g. the general public. Regulations:

 

  • require information to be given to persons affected, eg. living near the plant;
  • prescribe situations regarding emission of fumes, smoke, etc;
  • place duties on persons in control of premises in relation to harmful emissions into atmosphere.

 

4.    Duties towards the customer

 

  • Duties of those who design, manufacture, import or supply and install articles or substances are:

     

    • to ensure that they are safe and without risk to health;
    • to carry out tests, examination and research (or have it done on their behalf);
    • to provide adequate information regarding proper use, maintenance, etc;
    • to install or erect plant and equipment safely.

 

The duties can be relieved by a written undertaking from the supplier that he/she will take the steps to ensure that the article or substance will be safe in use or whilst being cleaned, maintained, etc.

 

5.    Duties of employees

 

  • to take reasonable care for themselves and others;
  • to co-operate with the employer and to use safety appliances;
  • not to interfere with or misuse safety appliances.

Furthermore no levy on employees is permitted for the position of statutory protective equipment.

 

6.   Written safety policies

Companies must prepare and revise, when necessary, a written statement of their general policy towards health and safety at work setting out:

 

  • the organisation - i.e. who is responsible;
  • the arrangements - i.e. what is to be done

 

 

GENERAL SAFETY

Introduction

The prevention of accidents in laboratories, stores, workshops and all other places of work is a duty of every individual using or entering them. Ensuring the safety of others is as important as the avoidance of personal injury.

Everyone should make it his or her first task to become familiar with any special instructions issued for dealing with emergencies peculiar to the place in which he or she is working.

 

General Safety Rules

 

Eating, drinking, smoking and the application of make-up in laboratories or when handling or working with chemicals is prohibited. Smoking may also be prohibited in many other areas as well.

You should familiarise yourself with:

 

  • the layout of the building;
  • the location of fire-fighting appliances and how they work;
  • ways of getting out of the building in an emergency which may be different to the way you came in;
  • the siting of telephones;
  • first aid arrangements.

 

Remember, it may be too late to find out very much when an emergency actually happens.

If you have any queries on safety matters consult your supervisor or safety representative.

 

1. FIRE:- GENERAL INFORMATION

 

1.1    Fire Precautions

 

Most fires can be prevented by applying routine precautions, some of which are set out below. When a fire occurs, the principal hazard to people is the smoke which is generated and most deaths at fires are due to asphyxia by smoke. Double doors in corridors and doors leading from kitchens are designed to retain the smoke to allow the remaining corridors to be used for evacuating the building. The walls of corridors have a specified fire resistance so that the fire can be contained in a small section of the building.

 

1.2     Means of Escape

Ensure that rooms, passages, corridors and stairways are not obstructed and that corridor fire doors are kept closed. If a room contains an emergency exit, make sure that it is unobstructed so that it is immediately available for use in an emergency.

 

1.3    Fire Extinguishers

Do not attempt to use an extinguisher unless you have received appropriate instruction and training and if it is safe to do so.

Discretion is essential in deciding the lengths to which first-aid fire-fighting is pursued. Portable fire-fighting equipment is not designed to cope with extensive fires and it is important that first-aid fire-fighting should cease and the location should be evacuated, as soon as the effects of fire threaten the means of escape, the building structure, or otherwise indicate that it is out of control.

Although further action might reduce material losses no such saving can compare in importance with human safety.

 

  • Before attempting to fight a fire always ensure the alarm has been raised and you are able to leave the area if the fire escalates out of control.
  • You should ensure you know the correct fire extinguisher to use and have received instruction in its use. For example, in a laboratory situation, use of the wrong choice of extinguisher can turn a minor incident into a major disaster.
  • Carbon dioxide extinguishers should be used with care. They can reduce the oxygen content of the atmosphere in a confined space to a dangerously low level.
  • Several kinds of fire-fighting equipment may be found in the workplace. It is the duty of everyone to know where they are located, and for what types of fire each one is intended. Whenever fire-fighting equipment has been used an immediate report should be made to the supervisor so that the equipment may be recharged or replaced.

1.4    Use of Fire Extinguishers

Carbon Dioxide - (usually Black in colour)

Carbon dioxide extinguishers are the type most generally used for electrical fires or in laboratories, and have several advantages in dealing with small fires. No mess is made and there is little danger of apparatus nearby being knocked over or damaged. They can be used where live electrical circuits are involved.

However, they have little cooling effect and until the extinguished material has cooled below the ignition temperature care must be taken to ensure that the fire does not re-ignite.

 

Water - (usually Red)

 

Extinguishers discharging water under pressure from a carbon dioxide cartridge are recommended for use on fires involving paper, wood, etc. They must not be used on fires where there are live electrical circuits. They may be used for solvents miscible with water. It should be noted that the strong jet of water can itself cause damage.

 

AFFF (Aqueous Film Forming Foam) - (usually Cream)

 

This is a multi-purpose extinguisher suitable for most types of fires (materials etc) and it is ideal for dealing with the majority of fires involving flammable liquids. The aqueous film prevents re-ignition of the fire with limited cooling properties.

Foam extinguishers may be used on immiscible liquids which are lighter than water, eg petrol and most oils. They must not be used where live electrical circuits are involved.

 

Hose Reels

 

These are usually sited in corridors or in large rooms, for use where extinguishers discharging water may be inadequate for the risk involved. They are intended to be used on fires involving wood structures, paper, fabrics, etc. The hoses are usually of 22 mm diameter and from 25-40 metres in length. Where a control valve is fitted, it is important to ensure that it is fully open before the hose is run out. Hoses fitted with automatic valves operate when between 1 to 3 metres of hose has been run off the wheel.

 

1.5    Fire/Smoke-Stop Doors

Fire/smoke-stop doors may be installed throughout buildings so as to prevent smoke and hot toxic gases circulating along routes to safety. These doors must not be wedged or propped open. They must be kept closed at all times after access and egress has been effected.

 

1.6    Fire Detection Systems

Fire detectors give an early warning of a fire, particularly if the fire starts in an unoccupied area. There are generally two types of detector used.

 

Heat Detectors

 

These contain either a bimetallic or thermistor device and operate when a rapid increase in temperature occurs. They are fitted in some kitchens, laboratories and corridors. Other heat detectors operate when a fixed

temperature, normally 60-70 oC, is exceeded and they are used when a rapid rise in temperature can be anticipated in normal operation, eg oven rooms and kitchens.

 

Smoke Detectors

 

These contain an ion-chamber and detect the products of combustion. They are the most sensitive of the automatic detectors. Because of their high sensitivity, larger areas can be protected by a single detector and these systems are found in most buildings.

All fire detectors are necessarily sensitive devices and can be easily activated to give a false alarm. Smoke detectors for instance can be activated by dust, steam or exhaust from petrol or diesel engines. Misuse of fire-fighting equipment, eg hose-reels, fire-extinguishers and fire-alarms, may render it inoperable when required in an emergency and could even result in loss of life. Moreover it is a criminal offence which may result in the imposition of severe penalties by the Courts and disciplinary action by the employer.

 

1.7    Fire Instructions

These appear in the Emergency Procedures for the organisation and possibly in the internal telephone directory. They should be displayed on notices in all buildings.

 

2.    PRECAUTIONS IN OFFICES, LIBRARIES, etc

 

A recent nation-wide survey has revealed that offices are the scene of a substantial number of serious accidents every year. Most of these are avoidable. There is an increasing use of machinery in offices, eg paper-guillotines, duplicators etc, which should only be operated according to the makers' instructions. Only maintenance personnel should remove the enclosing panels of machines.

All portable electric appliances should carry a current Portable Appliance Test label. Leads should not be allowed to trail in a manner likely to cause persons to trip over them or to pull over the item over. You should not leave appliances in precarious positions nor use waste-paper baskets as ashtrays.

Care must be taken to avoid spillage of water in rooms in which there are electric power points set in the floors. It is possible in some circumstances for a person standing on such a wet floor to receive a severe, possibly fatal, electric shock.

When carrying files, you should not carry so many that your vision is obscured. Filing cabinet drawers should always be closed as soon as you have found what you want. The corner of a metal drawer can inflict a very painful injury. Only open one drawer at a time because more than one drawer open may cause a filing cabinet to tip forward.

You must never stand on revolving stools or chairs and should avoid using any chair or stool where steps are provided. A fall onto the end of a desk or an open drawer can cause a very serious injury.

You should not leave stacks of boxes, kit bags or files on the floor near doorways for people to fall over. Polished floors, particularly if waxed or wet, offer a hazard. You should never run on the polished floors of corridors or common rooms.

 

3.     WORK OUTSIDE NORMAL HOURS

 

Many companies have their own rules with regard to work outside normal hours, eg 0800 to 1800 hrs, Mondays to Fridays. Saturdays, Sundays, Bank Holidays and other official holidays are usually regarded as outside normal hours.

Extreme care should be exercised when working outside these times and then only with the explicit authority of the management of that organisation. It should be forbidden to perform operations deemed hazardous by the employer, or his/her nominee, unless some other person is within calling distance.

This restriction also applies to the conduct of any experimental work except when prior permission has been given by the Head of the Section or his/her nominee for the particular work involved.

 

4. ELECTRICAL HAZARDS

 

Two of the worst electrical hazards are careless or unskilled workmanship and faulty or worn out equipment. Neither of these hazards need arise. Electric and electronic supplies and equipment, including batteries and electrolytic capacitors can be responsible for personal injury and even death. They can also cause fires and explosions. Remember, some foreign colour coding of electrical leads differs from British practice. IF IN DOUBT ASK.

 

4.1    Electricity and Fire

All portable electrical appliances should have a current PAT Certificate. This involves a mechanical and visual check that all socket outlets, switches, flexible leads and electrical appliances are in good condition. In case of fire involving electrical equipment, the first action to take must be to switch off the power supply to that equipment. You should extinguish an electrical fire with CARBON DIOXIDE, never with WATER or FOAM.

 

4.2    Use of Electric Points and Equipment

Lead length should be adequate for the particular job for which the equipment is currently being used . In no circumstances must you interfere with the wiring or connections of any electric point or appliance. All necessary adjustments or modifications to wiring will be carried out by a duly authorised competent person.

 

5.    NOISE

 

Noise can cause damage to hearing, reduce efficiency or merely annoy. Damage to hearing can result from a sudden violent sound producing an effect as dramatic as the rupture of an ear drum. Continuous exposure to lower noise levels can, however, produce deafness. In the latter case the impairment to hearing may pass unrecognised for a long period of time due to the insidiousness of the effect. For advice on noise problems you should consult the Organisation's Safety Officer.

 

6.    FIRST AID

It is a legal requirement to report all accidents in the workplace. Medical advice should always be sought, however serious the injury. Initially, simple first aid measures may be applied. Thus

 

6.1   Minor cuts

Cuts and grazes are best treated by cleansing under running water and then dried. A dry dressing or plaster should then be applied.

 

6.2     Severe bleeding

Bleeding will be stopped by applying direct pressure on a dressing covering the wound and if possible elevating the affected part.

 

6.3    Burns and scalds

The affected parts should be immersed under running cold water for about 10 minutes at least then a dry dressing only applied.

 

6.4     Chemical spillage

 

All chemicals must be washed off the body with copious amounts of water. Some laboratories have emergency showers and should always be used when available.

 

6.5     Needle stick injuries

 

Allow all puncture injuries to bleed freely then wash under running water using soap or a hand cleanser. The injury should be reported immediately to the Medical Centre or First Aider.

 

6.6     Eye injuries

 

All eye injuries must be irrigated thoroughly then treated at the Medical Centre or local hospital. You should never attempt to remove foreign objects from the eye. Always seek medical assistance. It must also be remembered that any sudden illnesses, bouts of ill health and injuries should be reported to the Medical Centre or first aider, as soon as possible.

To ensure your own safety, as far as reasonably practicable, you should employ the age old maxim

 

"If in doubt, ask"


Appendix 6 - Student Induction Checklist

(A copy of this form can be downloaded as a Microsoft Word '97 document  -Placement of Students App 6 (RTF, 10 KB))

 

UNIVERSITY OF ST.ANDREWS

 

STUDENT INDUCTION CHECKLIST

 

NAME OF STUDENT............................................................ Start date   ...............................

 

EMPLOYER   ..........................................................................................................................

 

The following items should be included in your induction into the organisation, preferably on your first day. Please check off the items below when they occur and inform your Placement Organiser of any items not covered within one week of the start of your placement. This list is not exhaustive and other topics may be covered, which you may note if you wish:

 

Health and Safety Issues                                                                                         Date                      
.  
Emergency Procedures  
Safety policy received or location known  
Location of First Aid box  
First Aid arrangements (including names of first aiders)  
Fire procedures and location of fire extinguishers  
Accident reporting and location of accident book  
COSHH regulations  
Display Screen Equipment regulations/procedures  
Manual handling procedures  
Protective clothing arrangements  
Instruction on equipment participant will be using

(list equipment)

 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
Other issues  
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

 

Signed.................................................. Date.....................................................


Appendix 7 - Guidance for Assessment of Placements (Health and Safety)

(A copy of this checklist can be downloaded as a Microsoft Word '97 document  -Placement of Students App 7 (RTF, 13 KB))

 

UNIVERSITY OF ST.ANDREWS

 

GUIDANCE FOR ASSESSMENT OF PLACEMENTS

(HEALTH AND SAFETY)

 

Employers have the primary duty to ensure the health and safety of placement participants during their placements. Universities and placement agencies also have a responsibility to ensure the suitability of placements. They need to be sure that placements meet appropriate standards of health, safety and welfare and that employers know about their health and safety duties. The following elements form the basis for an assessment policy.

N.B. Those carrying out such assessments should act, at all times, with tact and diplomacy and avoid any action which, however mistakenly, may be construed as prying into Company affairs.

 

Preliminary enquiries

 

Any potential employer new to the placements procedures will need to discuss with the Placement Organiser the objectives of the placement, the implications of accepting students in the workplace and then informed of, and issued with the Placement Health and Safety Checklist.

These discussions should preferably take place at the workplace and provide an opportunity for the Organiser to check the employer's management systems for ensuring occupational health, safety and welfare. Where the new employer works from several premises (for example a chain of estate agents, or a multiple outlet store) it may not always be necessary to visit each worksite. Much will depend on the Organiser's confidence in the health and safety management systems, as shown by responses to the points listed below.

Any employer of five or more people (including placement participants) who does not have, or is not willing to produce, a written statement of their policy on health and safety at work and of the arrangements for carrying that policy in to effect, should not be included in the placement scheme .

The employer's policy and arrangements should be based on their assessment of the risks to the health and safety of employees arising from their work . Where there are five or more employees the employer should keep a record of the significant findings of the risk assessment, and of any group(s) of employees identified by it as being especially at risk.

The Health and Safety Commission publishes a simple step by step guide to help small businesses prepare a suitable policy which includes other checks that should be made at the preliminary visit.

Thus,

 

  • Has the employer appointed someone to have overall responsibility for students on placements?
  • Has the employer confirmed that they have registered with the appropriate health and safety enforcing authority, where this is required? In general this applies to factories (including garages, dry-cleaners, and repair workshops), quarries, mines, offices, shops and some construction sites?
  • Has the employer agreed to give students appropriate supervision at all times and to provide them with training in health and safety issues?
  • Has the employer confirmed that there are procedures to deal with any accidents and emergencies that may arise?
  • In particular, is first aid equipment provided and are records of first aid treatments kept?
  • If required, are trained first aiders available?
  • Does the employer know that all accidents to students, however minor, must be reported to the placement organiser?
  • Has the employer confirmed that they have current employer's liability insurance? Insurance companies now carry out audits of the premises they insure and, if available, this information will greatly assist in determining the safety status of the organisation concerned. It will also give an indication of the insurer's professional risk assessment of the employer.

 

After discussing these and related issues the Placement Organiser should be able to assess the employer's general approach to occupational health and safety, and make a judgment about the placement's overall suitability. An essential part of the initial visit to the employer should be a brief walk around the workplace. This provides an opportunity to look at general conditions in the areas where students will be working. Useful indicators of appropriate attention to occupational health, safety and welfare in many workplaces are:

The general standard of housekeeping

 

  • Are there clear gangways?
  • Is the workplace clean?
  • Are stairways or doorways obstructed by stored goods?

The general level of lighting.

 

  • Is the workplace brightly lit or dingy?
  • Where work is done sitting down, are suitable seats provided?

 

Fire precautions.

 

  • Are there any fire extinguishers?
  • Does the employer have a system for checking them?
  • Are fire exits clearly marked and not obviously obstructed?
  • Are clear fire instructions displayed?

 

Electrical safety.

 

  • Are electric wires to be seen? Loose, bare, dusty and disorganised wires or broken plugs or switches indicate an unsafe electrical system.

 

Welfare facilities.

 

  • Are toilets and washing facilities adequate and kept clean?
  • Are soap and drying facilities provided?
  • Are any health and safety information posters displayed? Every employer should, as a minimum have displayed the poster "Health and Safety Law, What You Should Know", or alternatively have arranged for distribution of the leaflet of the same name to all employees.

 

Placement Organisers should look at the specific work to be done by participants, where possible. They could usefully ask about personal protective equipment, ensure that such equipment in appropriate sizes is available if needed and seek assurances that participants will be trained in its use. Similarly, organisers can ask if there are health risks associated with the work and if such risks have been assessed by the employer.

Placement Organisers should also enquire about any health-based limitations on the type of person who may be appropriate for the placement. Employers have a duty to assess the capabilities of their employees (which includes placement participants) in health and safety terms.

There may, for example, be operations involving possible exposure to sensitising agents that would not be appropriate to students with asthma. Another example might be a warehouse where there is a significant amount of works transport (lift trucks, etc.).In such a workplace a partially sighted student, or one with significant hearing loss, may need particularly careful supervision. It is best practice to discuss students' ability to carry out particular tasks with their tutors.

Where special arrangements are needed for students with disabilities, Placement Organisers should ensure that employers are given full information, and any necessary advice, well in advance of the placement.

Contact

Environmental Health and Safety Services contact details

University of St Andrews
Bute Building Queens Terrace
St Andrews
Fife
KY16 9TS
Scotland, United Kingdom

Tel: +44 (0)1334 462750
Fax:44 (0)1334 462747