Philosophy at St Andrews

Second year modules

PY2010 | PY2011 | PY2012 | PY2013 | PY2902

PY2010 Intermediate Logic

20 credits

This module aims to further develop students’ understanding of formal logic by the study of a broad array of systems of logic. The module covers classical, modal, intuitionistic, and other non-classical logics, looking at both propositional and quantified versions. Particular attention is paid to the difference between semantics and proof theory for such systems.

Semester: 1
Credits: 20
Time: 2.00 pm - 3.00 pm Mon, Tue, Thu and occasional Fri, Irvine Lecture Theatre
Teaching: 3 lectures and 1 tutorial.
Coordinator: Aaron Cotnoir
Tutorial times: Example Classes: running weekly from week 2

Group 1: Thursday 9 – 10, Arche Seminar Room
Group 2: Thursday 10 – 11, Arche Seminar Room
Group 3: Thursday 11 – 12, Arche Seminar Room
Group 4: Thursday 12 – 1, Arche Seminar Room
Group 5: Thursday 1 - 2, Arche Seminar Room
Group 6: Thursday 4 – 5, Edgecliffe 104

Logic Surgeries (non-compulsory revision type sessions)

Wednesday, 6 - 8, School V

PY2011 Foundations of Western Philosophy

20 credits

This module provides an introduction to central figures, texts and ideas of the period of Ancient Philosophy. Classical Greek philosophy – specifically the works of Plato and Aristotle – will always be at the core of the module. The study of Plato and Aristotle can serve as a focus for discussing either earlier (presocratic) or later philosophical developments. Themes covered will include: the nature of thought, natural science, the human mind, the theory of knowledge, metaphysics and the good life of the individual and of society.

Semester: 1
Credits: 20
Time: 3.00 pm - 4.00 pm Mon, Tue, Thu and occasional Fri, School III
Teaching: 3 lectures and 1 tutorial.
Coordinator: Barbara Sattler
Additional lecturers: Jens Timmermann
Tutorial times: Group 1: Monday 10 – 11, Edgecliffe G03
Group 2: Monday 11 – 12, Edgecliffe G03
Group 3: Monday 12-1, Edgecliffe G03
Group 4: Monday 1-2, Edgecliffe G03
Group 5: Tuesday 9-10, Edgecliffe 104
Group 6: Tuesday 10 – 11, Arche Seminar Room
Group 7: Tuesday 11 – 12, Arche Seminar Room
Group 8: Tuesday 12 – 1, Arche Seminar Room
Group 9: Wednesday 9 – 10, Edgecliffe G03
Group 10: Thursday 9 – 10, Edgecliffe G03
Group 11: Friday 9 – 10, Edgecliffe G01
Group 12: Friday 10 – 11, Edgecliffe G01
Group 13: Friday 11 – 12, Edgecliffe G01
Group 14: Friday 12 - 1, Arche Seminar Room

PY2012 Meaning and Knowing

20 credits

This module aims to provide a comprehensive foundation in both epistemology (the theory of knowledge) and the philosophy of language. It will typically cover the following central questions in epistemology: What is knowledge? What is evidence? Can we trust the evidence of the senses? Can we defeat the sceptic about knowledge? What are the limits of knowledge? What is the nature of belief? When is a belief a good belief? What is the nature of perception? What is the difference between mathematical knowledge and empirical knowledge? Questions covered on the philosophy of language component may include: What is communication? What is linguistic meaning? What is the difference between saying and implying? What is it for an expression to be context-sensitive? What is the nature of metaphor? Topics which span both components of the module include: internalism and externalism.

Semester: 2
Credits: 20
Time: 2.00pm - 3.00 pm Mon, Tue, Thu and occasional Fri, Irvine Lecture Theatre
Teaching: 3 lectures and 1 tutorial.
Coordinator: Walter Pedriali
Additional lecturers: Jessica Brown Imogen Dickie
Tutorial times: Group 1: Monday 9 – 10, Arche Seminar Room
Group 2: Monday 10 – 11, Arche Seminar Room
Group 3: Monday 12 – 1, Swallowgate S11
Group 4: Monday 4 – 5, Edgecliffe G01
Group 5: Tuesday 9 – 10, Edgecliffe G03
Group 6: Tuesday 10 – 11, Edgecliffe G03
Group 7: Tuesday 4 – 5, Edgecliffe G01
Group 8: Wednesday 12 – 1, Arche Seminar Room
Group 9: Thursday 9 - 10, Edgecliffe G03
Group 10: Thursday 1 – 2, Arts Seminar Room 7
Group 11: Thursday 4 - 5, Edgecliffe G01
Group 12: Friday 10 – 11, Edgecliffe G03
Group 13: Friday 12 - 1, Edgecliffe 104

PY2013 Moral and Aesthetic Value

20 credits

This module examines moral values, aesthetic values, and the relationship between them. Issues typically addressed may include the objectivity of moral and aesthetic values, the role of disagreement in morality and aesthetics, the relativity of moral and aesthetic judgement, the presence or the absence of principles in the moral and aesthetic domains, the possibility of moral and aesthetic knowledge, and the relation of morality and aesthetics to experience.

Semester: 2
Credits: 20
Time: 3.00 pm - 4.00 pm Mon, Tue, Thu and occasional Fri, School III
Teaching: 3 lectures and 1 tutorial.
Coordinator: Justin Snedegar
Additional lecturers: Lisa Jones
Tutorial times: Group 1: Monday 9 – 10, Edgecliffe G03
Group 2: Monday 1 - 2, Edgecliffe G01
Group 3: Tuesday 9 - 10, Edgecliffe G01
Group 4: Tuesday 11 - 12, Edgecliffe G01
Group 5: Tuesday 12 - 1, Edgecliffe G01
Group 6: Wednesday 9 - 10, Edgecliffe G03
Group 7: Wednesday 10 - 11, Edgecliffe G03
Group 8: Thursday 9 - 10, Arche Seminar Room
Group 9: Thursday 10 - 11, Arche Seminar Room
Group 10: Thursday 11 – 12, Arche Seminar Room
Group 11: Thursday 12 – 1, Arche Seminar Room
Group 12: Friday 9 - 10, Arche Seminar Room
Group 13: Friday 12 - 1, Edgecliffe G01
Group 14: Friday 1 - 2, Edgecliffe G01

PY2902 Knowledge, Mind and Reality - Evening Degree

20 credits

This module will acquaint students with a number of central topics in Epistemology, Philosophy of Mind, andMetaphysics. Students will have the opportunity to discuss and critically evaluate philosophical issues andproblems relating to such matters as knowledge (e.g.: what constitutes knowledge? How should we respond tosceptical arguments that threaten the very possibility of knowledge?), the mind-body problem (e.g.is the mindthe same thing as the brain? If not, what is it? Can the conscious mind be explained by science?), andmetaphysical questions concerning such matters as the nature of objects, persons and causation, and theexistence of God.

Semester: 1
Credits: 20
Teaching: 1 x 2.5-hour session per week: lectures and tutorials
Coordinator: Derek Ball
Additional lecturers: Walter Pedriali