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Academic skills for students

Essay/report writing, reflective writing, academic referencing, exam preparation, reading skills, note making, time management, presentation skills, critical thinking.

Your study skills survival guide

Date: Tue 10 Sep 2019
Time: 14:00- 15:00
Key details: Orientation event for undergraduates.

Target audience

Undergraduate students, primarily the first years.

Presenters

TBC

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

School 3, United Colleges (St Salvators Quad)

Course information

The jump from school to university is an exciting one, but you need to know about what's expected from University level study.  This indispensable session will help you navigate around 20 point scales, know who to go to for help when you need it, and let you think about our first-year study plan of attack. 

Kick Start your PGT Dissertation

Date: Tue 2 Jun 2020
Time: 9:30-16:00
Key details: A day to build your skills and confidence in writing your Masters dissertation or project

Target audience

Any PGT student writing a dissertation or extended project

Presenters

Miss Catriona Wilson
Dr Eilidh Harris

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

Parliament Hall

Course information

One of the requirements for finishing your Master’s programme is to write a dissertation, and you might be experiencing some of the challenges around it. Whether it is writer’s block or general disorientation on how to proceed, this workshop aims to get you started by breaking down the writing process into achievable tasks, while providing top tips and focusing on the future. We will look at developing a writing strategy, project and time management, writing workshops, and a wide range of activities throughout a day to help you unlock your potential!

Aims and objectives

  • Gain motivation for your summer of writing
  • Identify problems and solutions you may face in your dissertation
  • Gain confidence in project management (such as your dissertation)
  • Advance your academic writing, learning key skills for clear argumentation and producing cohesive and coherent texts. 
  • Summarise and explain your research topic to different audiences, sometimes without previous knowledge of your field
Communication and dissemination

Communication and presentation methods/skills; communication media; research writing; publishing; working with the media.

Course full, waiting list bookings only

Equalities in the REF

Date: Tue 27 Aug 2019
Time: 11:30 - 13:30
Key details: Invitation only / Requirement for all staff involved in preparations and support for submission to REF

Target audience

Invitation only - Heads of School, Directors of Research, Directors of Impact and School/dept E&D officers.

Prerequisites

No

Course pre-work

Please look over the St Andrews code of Practice

Presenters

Jennifer Pritchard
Mr Sukhi Bains
Mrs Louise Milne
Prof Ruth Woodfield

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

C5 Seminar Room, Bute Building - This venue does not have full mobility access. If you have any access requirements, please contact CAPOD direct at coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Course information

Invitation only event hosted by Research and Innovation Services in preparation for REF 2021: https://www.ref.ac.uk/    

The session will cover equality and diversity issues relating to REF processes, such as independence review, individual circumstances and REF check-in meetings.   

All staff involved in preparations and support for submission to REF are required to attend a tailored briefing session on Equality and Diversity, to ensure a consistent, fair and transparent approach is adopted across the institution.  Future dates will be circulated as they become available.  Staff are encouraged to attend this training at the earliest possible opportunity.

Please look over the St Andrews code of Practice prior to the session- https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/research/environment/ref-2021/staff-information/

Refreshments will be provided.

Aims and objectives

By the end of this event patrticipants should

  • Understand the processes within the institutional REF Code of Practice and how equality and diversity supported in the REF submission.

Engineering at the University of St Andrews

Date: Tue 27 Aug 2019
Time: 1030-1630
Key details: Optimising engineering expertise at St Andrews: invitation to a focus group

Target audience

Colleagues from Schools engaged in research related to engineering and engineering activities.

Prerequisites

Please complete the Engineering Mapping Form in Course Information in advance of the meeting and by 21 August at the latest.

Follow on course

None

Presenters

Professor Tom Brown

Course provider

Proctor's Office

Email: deansoffice@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

Upper College Hall

Course information

The University Strategy 2018-2023 makes a commitment to ‘recognise the significant expertise in engineering found across our Schools’ and, ‘provide focus and support for the development of a larger collaborative community of engineers working in a broad interdisciplinary context that concentrates on translation’. Today, many Schools at St Andrews have clusters of engineering expertise which in other Universities would be supported within engineering departments. That we don’t have this in St Andrews means we risk missing opportunities to come together to do research, as well as teach, build impact and recognise success. 

To address this Professor Tom Brown, Vice-Principal for Research and Innovation, will host a focus group to examine and scope the role an ‘Institute’ at St Andrews can play in advancing engineering. The meeting mixes opportunities to listen to presentations on areas of engineering research with participative sessions.

To help map our current engineering expertise, please complete this short form in advance of the meeting and by 21 August at the latest.

Engineering Mapping Form - TO COMPLETE BEFORE THE EVENT

If you have questions about the event, please contact Dr Emma Read Kallblad (erk3@) Executive Officer, Strategy and Policy.

 

Aims and objectives

  • Map a picture of research related to engineering and engineering acvtivities already on-going at St Andrews.
  • Understand emerging opportunities, and what expertise we need to engage.

  • Scope a shared vision of what an ‘Institute’ for engineering at St Andrews could look like.

  • Identify next steps and the support needed to take them.

Booking not required

Welcome event for Taught Postgraduates

Date: Mon 9 Sep 2019
Time: 1100-1200

Target audience

Taught Postgraduates

Presenters

Miss Catriona Wilson

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

Parliament Hall

Course information

These informal welcome events are intended to allow new Taught Postgraduate (Masters) students the chance to meet each other in one of the University's most impressive buildings (Parliament Hall). 

Students will be able to hear from members of University who provide help and support to taught postgraduates:

  • The Pro-Dean for taught postgraduate students
  • The Careers Service
  • The Centre for Academic, Professional and Organisational Development (CAPOD)
  • Student Advice and Support
  • English Language Teaching
  • The University Chaplain
  • The Library
  • The Postgraduate Society

Additionally, students will be invited to take part in a networking activity to allow them to meet other new Masters students.

There are 4 welcome sessions running and, as numbers to the hall are limited, admission will be on a 'first come, first served' basis. When the hall is full, any students who have not been able to be accomodated will be given priority to attend the next session.

The session times are:

  • 1100-1200
  • 1215-1315
  • 1330-1430
  • 1445-1545
Booking not required

Welcome event for Taught Postgraduates

Date: Mon 9 Sep 2019
Time: 1215-1315

Target audience

Taught Postgraduates

Presenters

Miss Catriona Wilson

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

Parliament Hall

Course information

These informal welcome events are intended to allow new Taught Postgraduate (Masters) students the chance to meet each other in one of the University's most impressive buildings (Parliament Hall). 

Students will be able to hear from members of University who provide help and support to taught postgraduates:

  • The Pro-Dean for taught postgraduate students
  • The Careers Service
  • The Centre for Academic, Professional and Organisational Development (CAPOD)
  • Student Advice and Support
  • English Language Teaching
  • The University Chaplain
  • The Library
  • The Postgraduate Society

Additionally, students will be invited to take part in a networking activity to allow them to meet other new Masters students.

There are 4 welcome sessions running and, as numbers to the hall are limited, admission will be on a 'first come, first served' basis. When the hall is full, any students who have not been able to be accomodated will be given priority to attend the next session.

The session times are:

  • 1100-1200
  • 1215-1315
  • 1330-1430
  • 1445-1545
Booking not required

Welcome event for Taught Postgraduates

Date: Mon 9 Sep 2019
Time: 1330-1430

Target audience

Taught Postgraduates

Presenters

Miss Catriona Wilson

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

Parliament Hall

Course information

These informal welcome events are intended to allow new Taught Postgraduate (Masters) students the chance to meet each other in one of the University's most impressive buildings (Parliament Hall). 

Students will be able to hear from members of University who provide help and support to taught postgraduates:

  • The Pro-Dean for taught postgraduate students
  • The Careers Service
  • The Centre for Academic, Professional and Organisational Development (CAPOD)
  • Student Advice and Support
  • English Language Teaching
  • The University Chaplain
  • The Library
  • The Postgraduate Society

Additionally, students will be invited to take part in a networking activity to allow them to meet other new Masters students.

There are 4 welcome sessions running and, as numbers to the hall are limited, admission will be on a 'first come, first served' basis. When the hall is full, any students who have not been able to be accomodated will be given priority to attend the next session.

The session times are:

  • 1100-1200
  • 1215-1315
  • 1330-1430
  • 1445-1545
Booking not required

Welcome event for Taught Postgraduates

Date: Mon 9 Sep 2019
Time: 1445-1545

Target audience

Taught Postgraduates

Presenters

Miss Catriona Wilson

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

Parliament Hall

Course information

These informal welcome events are intended to allow new Taught Postgraduate (Masters) students the chance to meet each other in one of the University's most impressive buildings (Parliament Hall). 

Students will be able to hear from members of University who provide help and support to taught postgraduates:

  • The Pro-Dean for taught postgraduate students
  • The Careers Service
  • The Centre for Academic, Professional and Organisational Development (CAPOD)
  • Student Advice and Support
  • English Language Teaching
  • The University Chaplain
  • The Library
  • The Postgraduate Society

Additionally, students will be invited to take part in a networking activity to allow them to meet other new Masters students.

There are 4 welcome sessions running and, as numbers to the hall are limited, admission will be on a 'first come, first served' basis. When the hall is full, any students who have not been able to be accomodated will be given priority to attend the next session.

The session times are:

  • 1100-1200
  • 1215-1315
  • 1330-1430
  • 1445-1545

SUII Information Session

Date: Tue 17 Sep 2019
Time: 11:00-12:30
Key details: The Scottish Universities Insight Institute (SUII) will highlight their knowledge exchange programme and upcoming funding calls

Target audience

Academic, Research and Professional Staff, PGRs and externals

Presenters

Nicola Duncan
Charlie Woods

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

C5 Seminar Room, Bute Building - This venue does not have full mobility access. If you have any access requirements, please contact CAPOD direct at coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Course information

SUII

The Scottish Universities Insight Institute (SUII) is a joint venture of six Higher Education Institutions. SUII projects aim to stimulate in-depth knowledge exchange through workshops, seminars, and other activities over a period of around six months. SUII provides both financial and logistical support for events.

Knowledge exchange programmes

The Insight Institute supports short term, collaborative programmes involving academics, policymakers and practitioners. Programmes are intended to break down disciplinary and organisational barriers in bringing together a range of stakeholder from different backgrounds. They seek to mobilise existing knowledge in fresh ways through sustained and collaborative focus on a shared issue, and aim to support decision makers in all sectors of society in being better informed.

Latest Call for Proposals: Accelerating progress towards the United Nations Global Goals

The United Nations Global Sustainable Development Goals were supported by 193 signatories at the General Assembly of the UN in September 2015.  They form part of the UN Agenda 2030 for Sustainable Development. The goals are aimed at “mobilizing efforts to end all forms of poverty, fighting inequalities and tackling climate change, while ensuring that no one is left behind”. They are summarised as being all about “people, planet, prosperity, peace and partnership”.

This call for proposals seeks applications for projects that will accelerate progress towards the achievement of these goals in Scotland and the wider world. It is intended that this broad theme will be pursued over the course of the next three calls for proposals. The current call will consider all aspects of the goals, future calls may focus on more specific aspects. Proposals could focus on individual goals but we are particularly interested in those that consider the interrelationship between goals.

Find out more about SUII and the latest funding call 

Come along to this short information session to find out more about taking part in this collaborative programme

---------------------------------

Parking on the day

If you are a visitor to St Andrews and need to find parking, here is a map which shows the various parking areas. The largest free car park is at Ref 15.  

The venue is no. 70 on the map: https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/media/university/maps/wwwmap.pdf

Funny Research: Bright Club stand-up comedy workshop

Date: Mon 23 Sep 2019
Time: 14.00-17.00
Programme: Public Engagement Portfolio - Academic & Research Staff
Programme: Public Engagement Portfolio - PGRs
Programme: Public Engagement Portfolio - Professional Staff
Programme: Passport to Research Futures
Key details: Training in developing presentation and public engagement skills, with the opportunity to translate what is learnt into a stand-up comedy routine at a Bright Club St Andrews event.

Target audience

Researchers in any discipline and at any level - the only requirement is that you have done some research!

Course mapped to

Vitae's Researcher Development Framework domains: D2 (Communication and dissemination), D3 (Public engagement)

Presenters

Dr Kate Cross

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

C5 Seminar Room, Bute Building - This venue does not have full mobility access. If you have any access requirements, please contact CAPOD direct at coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Course information

Using humour is a great way to communicate with the general public about your work in an engaging and accessible way. This course will develop your presentation skills and help you think about alternative ways to present your research to a wide range of audiences – with an emphasis on comedy.

This training session includes a series of exercises designed to get you talking about your research in front of others and thinking about new ways to approach your topic. The session will include tips on performing on stage, writing jokes about what you do and some ideas to get you started with writing your first comedy routine.  Although the emphasis is on stand-up, there is no pressure at this point to be funny! Even if you ultimately decide that performing on stage isn't for you, the skills you learn will make you a more confident presenter and encourage you to look at your research once again from first principles.

What previous participants have said about this course:

  • "Good way to learn public speaking while expressing your research in [an] easy manner."
  • "Lovely presenter, great fun, useful skills to gain."
  • "The idea that I could be funny was far-fetched before, but I left feeling somewhat convinced."
  • "It's a lot of fun.  You're funnier than you think."

Aims and objectives

By the end of this workshop you should be able to:

  • Talk confidently about the basic points of your research for a general audience.
  • Start writing funny material about your work.
  • Have a confident stage presence when presenting.

Writing for the web

Date: Wed 25 Sep 2019
Time: 1000 to 1230
Programme: Digital visa
Key details: Write effective content and design helpful web pages

Target audience

Staff interested in improving their digital writing skills, particularly for websites. Those on the digital visa programme will have priority of place until one week before the course starts, when we will start accepting those on the waiting list on a first-come first-served basis. If you are interested in signing up for the digital visa, please email Jennifer Hamrick at jh280@st-andrews.ac.uk.

Prerequisites

None

Follow on course

N/A

Presenters

Jennifer Hamrick

Course provider

Website: Digital communications team

Email: jh280@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

Swallowgate PC Classroom, School of Classics, Butts Wynd

Course information

Interested in learning how to write for the web? This course will teach you the fundamentals of using user-centred design to write effective content and design helpful web pages.

This course is for staff only. Those on the digital visa programme will have priority of place until one week before the course starts, when we will start accepting those on the waiting list on a first-come first-served basis. If you are interested in signing up for the digital visa, please email Jennifer Hamrick at jh280@st-andrews.ac.uk.

Aims and objectives

The aim of this session is to allow you to identify and implement user needs in web writing. 

By the end of this session, you will be able to:

  • define user-centred design.
  • generate user stories.
  • analyse how people use the web.
  • identify technology challenges for web writing.
  • identify what to avoid when writing for the web.
  • apply user needs when editing and writing content.

Critical thinking

Date: Thu 26 Sep 2019
Time: 10:00-13:00
Key details: In this workshop we identify qualities that are key to a critical engagement with academic work.

Course pre-work

To attend this course, you need to bring printed copy of a short article in your field that is relevant to your dissertation or research interests.

Presenters

Dr Mimo Caenepeel

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

C5 Seminar Room, Bute Building - This venue does not have full mobility access. If you have any access requirements, please contact CAPOD direct at coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Course information

Critical’ is a word that is frequently used in academic discourse. Students and researchers are advised to think, read and write ‘critically’. But what does ‘critical’ actually mean in an academic context? In this workshop we identify qualities that are key to a critical engagement with academic work, and we explore through examples how you can apply critical values to your reading, writing and academic practice.

Pre-course requirement:

To attend this course, you need to bring a printed copy of a short article in your field that is relevant to your dissertation or research interests.

Aims and objectives

Learn about qualities that are key to critical engagement

Practise applying critical values to reading and writing

The writing process: getting started

Date: Wed 2 Oct 2019
Time: 10.00-13.00
Key details: A hands-on workshop offering tools and tips for generating, focusing, targeting and structuring your writing. Of particular relevance in the first half of your PhD.

Target audience

Of particular relevance to doctoral students (from all disciplines) in the first half of their PhD, or students or research staff who have little experience of academic writing.

Course mapped to

Vitae's Researcher Development Framework domains: A1 (Knowledge base), D2 (Communication and dissemination)

Presenters

Dr Mimo Caenepeel

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

C5 Seminar Room, Bute Building - This venue does not have full mobility access. If you have any access requirements, please contact CAPOD direct at coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Course information

For many researchers, starting to write is one of the most challenging aspects of doing a PhD. How do you know whether you are ready to turn ideas and outcomes into text? How do you overcome that sense of overwhelm that often accompanies the early stages of the writing process? This workshop provides practical tools and tips for making the transition into writing by developing focus, structure and a writing habit.

What previous participants have said about this course:

  • "Ideal because it addresses the mental blocks to writing - thus enabling you to work through the structural challenges of writing."
  • "Very good to get you started on writing and useful tips. Encouragement to write!"
  • "I would recommend it to people who do not like writing and think nothing could help them going through the process."
  • "Outstanding presenter - engaging, patient, authoritative."

Aims and objectives

By the end of the workshop, students should be able to:

  • Identify their strengths and weaknesses as academic writers.
  • Use simple tools for starting, and continuing, to write.
  • Apply strategies to energise their writing when they get stuck.

Law & Ethics: Research involving animals

Date: Wed 2 Oct 2019
Time: 10:00 - 11:00
Key details: Guidance on research involving animals for any animal research.

Target audience

all

Presenters

Dr Tamara Lawson

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

Parliament Hall

Course information

This training session will be extremely useful to those who plan to undertake any research involving animals and will provide:

  • An introduction to law and ethics for research involving animals
  • An overview of information pertinent to important ethics regulations and the ethics process
  • Important information regarding the local structure, key roles and their related tasks

This training will also explore how people’s roles and the structures involved contribute to the welfare of animals, good science, implementation of the Three R’s, and support a culture of care.

Topics for both non-ASPA and ASPA work will be covered.

Aims and objectives

The aims and objectives of this training session are...

  • To discuss legislation and guidance and how it relates to the care of animals for scientific purposes
  • To highlight the boundaries in the legislation, so you know what aspects may make your work require a UK licence
  • To provide information for ethics applications on ethical concerns
  • To inform individuals where to go for guidance and who is responsible
  • To provide information on specific roles and responsibilities
  • To be aware of the tasks of the Animal Welfare Ethics Review Body
  • To promote awareness of the culture of care and the 3Rs: reduction, refinement and replacement
  • To highlight what individuals needs to consider before commencing their projects.
Course full, waiting list bookings only

Effective communication

Date: Mon 7 Oct 2019
Time: 1300-1700
Programme: Passport to Management Excellence
Programme: Passport to Administrative Excellence

Target audience

Open to all staff who wish to improve their communication skills

Presenters

Graeme Hawes

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

C5 Seminar Room, Bute Building - This venue does not have full mobility access. If you have any access requirements, please contact CAPOD direct at coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Course information

Communication with others is something that we all do, all the time, both at work and outside of the workplace.  This course has been designed to give participants the opportunity to find out about some of the theory which underpins Effective Communication, and also includes practical exercises and discussions which will enable the theory to be put into practice.

With the number of options for communication increasing, we will also look at using different forms of technology to communicate.

 

Aims and objectives

Objectives

  • Learn about relevant theories relating to communication including both the individual and organisational level;
  • Understand the methods of communication that are available and know how to decide which medium is appropriate;
  • Participate in case studies and tasks which highlight some real life examples;
  • Consider the use of technology in communication:  email; social networking; podcasts; websites; forums.

 

Finding your (Public Engagement) voice

Date: Mon 7 Oct 2019
Time: 09.30-12.30
Programme: Public Engagement Portfolio - Academic & Research Staff
Programme: Public Engagement Portfolio - PGRs
Programme: Public Engagement Portfolio - Professional Staff
Key details: Core activity for Public Engagement Portfolio

Target audience

Anyone participating on the Public Engagement Portfolio (PEP)

Course mapped to

Vitae's Researcher Development Framework domains: D2 (Communication and dissemination), D3 (Public engagement)

Presenters

Dr Kate Cross

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

Parliament Hall

Course information

This session is about how to go from ‘having a head full of complicated information’ to ‘effectively communicating some of that information to an audience’ using the skills and strengths that you already have.

We’ll cover:

  • Selecting what to communicate (You have time and space for less than you think – so what is the most important point?)
  • Considering who you want to communicate with (Do they need to know what you want to tell them? What existing knowledge or level of interest can you assume?)
  • Style (Do you want to be informative, entertaining, or both? Do you want to give facts or tell a story? Do you want to be authoritative or personal?)
  • Why it matters to you that you communicate at all (This will guide your answers to the other questions)

Using the answers to these questions, we’ll discuss ways of writing and speaking that can help you achieve your aims, as well as discussing some common pitfalls and how to avoid them.

 

Aims and objectives

By the end of this workshop you should be able to:

  • Feel more confident about presenting your research

Writing a literature review in the Sciences

Date: Tue 8 Oct 2019
Time: 13.30-16.30
Key details: Of particular relevance in last half of your research degree. Please bring two published regular articles (not letters or review articles) from your own discipline that you are already familiar with.

Target audience

Research postgraduate students from the Science disciplines, particularly in the later stages of the PhD.

Course pre-work

Please bring along one or two articles that you have already read, and a copy of your most recent annual progress report (if you have one).

Course mapped to

Vitae's Researcher Development Framework domains: A1 (Knowledge base), D2 (Communication and dissemination)

Presenters

Dr Marialuisa Aliotta

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Course information

The workshop will focus on three key aspects of the Literature Review in scientific disciplines:

  • What is a Literature Review?
  • Why is it important?
  • How to write one?

The aim is to provide research students with a deep appreciation of the purpose and importance of the literature review as a key component of a thesis or a research paper in scientific disciplines. During the workshop you will have opportunities to put into practice some of the techniques and tools presented. These will aid you in understanding the structure and style of the scientific language and will provide a useful framework within which you can further develop your critical reading and writing skills.

The workshop is intended for research students (particularly PhDs) in scientific disciplines nearing the end of their degree programmes. The course will be presented by an experienced full-time academic who is active in research and teaching and who has supported the career development of PhD students and postdocs throughout her career. It will involve a number of short presentations, discussions and other activities.

Please bring along one or two articles that you have already read, and a copy of your most recent annual progress report (if you have one).

What previous participants have said about this event:

  • "Explains the purpose and extent of the literature review in a nice and clear perspective. Gives suggestions and guidelines to be a good academic writer."
  • "Mind mapping was brilliant to kick off the writing the Literature Review. Critical reading was also fantastic thing to learn. Thanks a lot!"
  • "Presenter really knows about the topic."
  • "It is fundamental to have this kind of training during PhD."

Aims and objectives

By the end of the workshop participants should be able to:

  • Understand the purpose of a literature review.
  • Develop awareness about critical thinking.
  • Learn how to critically assess the work of others (and their own).
  • Be able to discern what to include in the literature review.
  • Plan a literature review and its layout.
  • Learn about conventions and formatting.
Booking available soon

Writing a literature review (Arts Thesis)

Date: Wed 9 Oct 2019
Time: 10.00-13.00
Key details: Of particular relevance in the first year of your PhD. Bring along a printed copy of an article you are planning to include in your literature review.

Target audience

Of particular relevance to doctoral students (from all disciplines) in the first year of their PhD.

Course pre-work

Please bring along printed copy of an article (by an author other than yourself) that you are planning to discuss or make reference to in your literature review.

Course mapped to

Vitae's Researcher Development Framework domains: A1(Knowledge base), D2 (Communication and dissemination)

Presenters

Dr Mimo Caenepeel

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

C5 Seminar Room, Bute Building - This venue does not have full mobility access. If you have any access requirements, please contact CAPOD direct at coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Course information

The literature review is a key component of a PhD: it motivates and contextualises the research question and launches the research. But developing a review is a complex task. Navigating seemingly limitless publications and shaping wide-ranging notes into a coherent text can feel overwhelming. This workshop offers practical ways of managing this process and laying the foundations for a review that meets the relevant criteria.

Please bring along a printed copy of a short article in your field that you are familiar with and that you are planning to discuss or refer to in your literature review.

What previous participants have said about this course:

  • "It is brilliant if you feel overwhelmed because it teaches how to dissect, critique and sort sources."
  • "Extremely helpful in identifying how to improve your reading + how this will assist the lit review."
  • "I am so glad I attended this at the beginning of my studies. It will make me much more efficient and effective in my reading."
  • "Very useful advice for one of the hardest, least-well defined, and ultimately boring stages of the PhD."

Aims and objectives

By the end of the workshop, students should be able to:

  • Break down the complexity of writing a review into more manageable tasks.
  • Use templates in their reading and note-taking.
  • Develop a potential structure fo rtheir review in terms of strands, key publications and forward movement.

Writing for the web

Date: Mon 14 Oct 2019
Time: 1400 to 1630
Programme: Digital visa
Key details: Write effective content and design helpful web pages

Target audience

Staff interested in improving their digital writing skills, particularly for websites. Those on the digital visa programme will have priority of place until one week before the course starts, when we will start accepting those on the waiting list on a first-come first-served basis. If you are interested in signing up for the digital visa, please email Jennifer Hamrick at jh280@st-andrews.ac.uk.

Prerequisites

None

Follow on course

N/A

Presenters

Jennifer Hamrick

Course provider

Website: Digital communications team

Email: jh280@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

Swallowgate PC Classroom, School of Classics, Butts Wynd

Course information

Interested in learning how to write for the web? This course will teach you the fundamentals of using user-centred design to write effective content and design helpful web pages.

This course is for staff only. Those on the digital visa programme will have priority of place until one week before the course starts, when we will start accepting those on the waiting list on a first-come first-served basis. If you are interested in signing up for the digital visa, please email Jennifer Hamrick at jh280@st-andrews.ac.uk.

Aims and objectives

The aim of this session is to allow you to identify and implement user needs in web writing. 

By the end of this session, you will be able to:

  • define user-centred design.
  • generate user stories.
  • analyse how people use the web.
  • identify technology challenges for web writing.
  • identify what to avoid when writing for the web.
  • apply user needs when editing and writing content.
Booking available soon

Is my writing 'academic' enough?

Date: Tue 15 Oct 2019
Time: 10.00-13.00
Key details: Explore the standards and expectations associated with academic writing. Of particular relevance in the first half of your PhD. You must bring a printed copy of a piece of your academic writing.

Target audience

Of particular relevance to doctoral students in the first half of their PhD.

Course pre-work

Please bring a printed copy of a piece of your own academic writing to the workshop, such as a research report, a thesis chapter or an article. If possible this should be something you are working on at the moment, or have been working on recently.

Course mapped to

Vitae's Researcher Development Framework domains A1: Knowledge base, D2: Communication and dissemination

Presenters

Dr Mimo Caenepeel

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

C5 Seminar Room, Bute Building - This venue does not have full mobility access. If you have any access requirements, please contact CAPOD direct at coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Course information

Does academic writing have to be dull or obscure, or can it be engaging and clear? This workshop explores the standards and conventions (as well as the myths) that surround writing in an academic context. Our focus will be on identifying key requirements for strong academic writing, and translating those into practical checks to ensure that your text meets relevant expectations.

To attend this workshop, you need to bring some of your recent academic writing (ideally something you are working on at the moment).

What previous participants have said about this course:

  • "Mimo is extremely skilled, and the workshop time, no matter the topic, provides extremely beneficial new/fresh methods of considering your work. Revitalising + clarifying.
  • "Very helpful for finding out what your supervisors seem to magically expect you to have."
  • "You discuss issues with people from outside your school, very useful."
  • "Very useful - outlined what is required for academic writing with examples."

Aims and objectives

By the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  • Identify standards and conventions that are distinct to academic writing.
  • Develop a reflective approach to academic writing, based on an understanding of the relationship between academic goals and writing strategies.
  • Describe the impact of linguistic choices such as the use of active or passive constructions.
  • Define textual properties like formality in terms of a continuum rather than a rigid dichotomy.
Booking available soon

Publish or perish: academic publishing in a nutshell

Date: Thu 17 Oct 2019
Time: 10.00-13.00
Key details: An overview of the whole publishing process, covering the editorial process, various publishing models, open access, legal considerations and how to navigate it all.

Course mapped to

Vitae's Researcher Development Framework domain: D2 (Communication and dissemination)

Presenters

Dr Joanna Young

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

C5 Seminar Room, Bute Building - This venue does not have full mobility access. If you have any access requirements, please contact CAPOD direct at coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Course information

Publishing your work and sharing your findings is a key component of a successful research career. A significant time investment is required to successfully publish a paper and several skills are used during the process including collaborative writing, figure design, analysis and concise written communication. With 30,000 journals to choose from and various publishing models to consider, researchers need to be aware of which option will work best for them.

Academic publishing is currently undergoing a revolution and there have been several new developments in recent years, including the rise of open access journals, the requirement to share data and new regulations. Participants will be introduced to the editorial process, various publishing models, open access publishing, legal considerations and how to navigate the academic publishing process.

This workshop is designed to cover the key actions and issues behind publishing a research paper including manuscript preparation, choosing the appropriate journal and peer review. In addition it will include an introduction to the controversial subject of metrics. The instructor’s own publishing experience will be used to illustrate key points.

 

Aims and objectives

By the end of this workshop you should be able to:

  • Understand and describe the scholarly publishing process.
  • Identify journals relevant for you research and plan a publication strategy that works for you.
  • Understand the phases of the publication process and how you can optimise the process to your advantage.

 

Booking available soon

Navigating peer review: challenges, responses & publishing

Date: Thu 17 Oct 2019
Time: 14.00-17.00
Key details: This workshop will introduce researchers to the peer review system, the process, the complexities, and the responsibilities of both the author and the reviewer.

Course mapped to

Vitae's Researcher Development Framework domains: C1 (Professional conduct), D2 (Communication and dissemination)

Presenters

Dr Joanna Young

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

C5 Seminar Room, Bute Building - This venue does not have full mobility access. If you have any access requirements, please contact CAPOD direct at coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Course information

All researchers will encounter peer review during their career, both as an author of research papers, books, fellowship applications or grants and as an expert who has been asked to review one of these documents. This workshop will introduce researchers to the peer review system, the process, the complexities, the responsibilities of the author and the reviewer and how to get the most out of the experience.

An awareness and knowledge of the peer review system is important so that early career researchers know what to expect when they submit their first research paper. Equally, understanding how to critically assess a research manuscript for quality, style, content, novelty and relevance gives researchers an insight into how cutting edge research is assessed and published. What should you look for in a manuscript? How can you optimise your chances of success as an author?

In this workshop, participants will be introduced to the academic publishing and peer review system through short presentations, discussions and peer review exercises. The workshop is suitable for PhD students and early career researchers who are writing a manuscript for publication or who are interested in finding out more about the peer review process.

Aims and objectives

By the end of this workshop you should be able to:

  • Understand the peer review process and timeline.
  • Understand what peer reviewers look for when they are assessing a manuscript and know how to respond to their comments.
  • Describe how peer reviews are performed and be aware of how to manage the process of peer review for your own research papers.

Posters and graphical abstracts: How to present your science visually

Date: Fri 18 Oct 2019
Time: 14.00-17.00
Programme: Public Engagement Portfolio - PGRs
Key details: This workshop introduces researchers to the fundamentals of communicating science research via visual means.

Target audience

Doctoral students from science disciplines, at any year of study. Arts students are welcome as well, but the focus will be on presenting science.

Course mapped to

Vitae's Researcher Development Framework domains A1: Knowledge base, D2: Communication and dissemination

Presenters

Dr Mhairi Towler

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

C5 Seminar Room, Bute Building - This venue does not have full mobility access. If you have any access requirements, please contact CAPOD direct at coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Course information

Sharing your research findings via a poster is commonplace during the course of postgraduate study, whether within your own department or at an international conference. This workshop is designed for individuals who wish to understand how good, basic design can enhance the quality of their poster presentations.

In addition, many science journals now require the submission of a graphical abstract along with submission of a manuscript. This workshop will look at how to go about designing a graphical abstract on your research findings.

Practical exercises will be carried out on your own research topic, therefore it is a good idea to think about this in advance and have some ideas of what visuals you may want to include.  If participants want to bring along posters they have designed previously for critique that is also an option.

Participants are welcome to bring laptops though this is not essential.

What previous participants have said about this course:

  • "Good range of examples, introduced some useful wider reading.  Critique of poster ideas was very helpful in developing ideas for next poster."
  • “I enjoyed the practical sessions where we worked on poster design and graphical abstracts based on our own research topics.”
  • "A very constructive workshop which introduces more creative ways to present research."
  • "I think the workshop on the whole was very helpful - learnt a lot of do's & don'ts for a poster presentation.  Very interactive and interesting."
  • "I highly recommend this to all students who require [sic] to present posters."
  • “Very useful if you have upcoming conferences or presentations where you need to represent data in a more appealing and accessible format.”

Aims and objectives

By the end of this workshop, you should be able to:

  • Define the principles around effective poster design including layout, colour and font selection.
  • Produce a draft plan for your poster.
  • Produce a hand drawn graphical abstract on your research area.

Evaluation of Public Engagement

Date: Tue 22 Oct 2019
Time: 10:00 - 13:00
Programme: Public Engagement Portfolio - Academic & Research Staff
Programme: Public Engagement Portfolio - PGRs
Programme: Public Engagement Portfolio - Professional Staff
Key details: Public Engagement Portfolio - optional / Learn how to plan, conduct, and feedback the evaluation of your activities

Target audience

Academics, Research & Professional Staff, PGRs from any discipline

Course pre-work

Please give consideration to what you want to achieve with your public engagement and whom you want to engage with.

Course mapped to

Vitae's Researcher Development Framework domains: C, D

Presenters

Dr Mhairi Stewart

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

C5 Seminar Room, Bute Building - This venue does not have full mobility access. If you have any access requirements, please contact CAPOD direct at coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Course information

What is an appropriate level of evaluation for different activities?  What sort of data should we be collecting?

And how can we make sure that evaluation is integral but not inhibiting our engagement activities?

In this workshop we will explore how to make evaluation timely, effective and informative without being dull, time-consuming and alienating.

What previous participants have said about this course:

  • "Massively helpful with exploring the different perspectives in running the evaluation process. Also enjoyed the structure of the workshop."
  • "The presenter was simply amazing! Love how we engaged with all the other like-minded participants."
  • "Great introduction to evaluation and you get tips on how to do evaluation properly."
  • "This is an amazing event to loose the fear of evaluation and to oimprove both your resarch and well as public eng. [sic] activities. This is very relevant for any career development."

Aims and objectives

 By the end of this workshop participants should be able to:

  • Identify the key components of an effective evaluation plan
  • Have an awareness of the breadth of methodologies and when you might use them
  • Apply both qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis techniques
  • Understand the use of both formative and summative evaluation components
  • Apply the Logic Model framework to evaluation and project development
Booking available soon

Writing well: coherence, structure and argumentation

Date: Wed 23 Oct 2019
Time: 10.00-13.00
Key details: Of particular relevance in the latter half of your PhD. Please bring a printed copy of a short excerpt from your academic writing, eg the first few pages of a thesis chapter or a paper. Work in progress is fine. Please also bring a laptop if you have one.

Target audience

Of particular relevance to doctoral students (in all disciplines) in the latter half of their PhD.

Course pre-work

Please bring a printed copy of a piece of your own academic writing to the workshop, for example a thesis chapter or a paper.

Course mapped to

Vitae's Researcher Development Framework domains: A1 (Knowledge base), D2 (Communication and dissemination)

Presenters

Dr Mimo Caenepeel

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

C5 Seminar Room, Bute Building - This venue does not have full mobility access. If you have any access requirements, please contact CAPOD direct at coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Course information

We all want our writing to be well-structured – but what does that mean in practice? In this workshop we look at different aspects of organising a text. Topics include:

  • creating coherence
  • ordering sentences into paragraphs, and paragraphs into sections
  • highlighting connections and transitions
  • developing an argument

To attend this workshop, you need to bring a piece of (your own) academic writing, ideally something that you’re currently working on, eg a thesis chapter or a paper.

What previous participants have said about this course:

  • "Very useful in the writing process, especially if you're at the drafting stage."
  • "I found it useful thinking more scientifically about my work & writing looking particularly at whether I use core sentences & the pointers I put in the text to convey my logic."
  • "It highlighted aspects I would normally take for granted about writing."
  • "It offers a great possibility to critically look at the structure of your writing."

Aims and objectives

By the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  • check their writing for textual features that support coherence
  • sketch the structure of their text in terms of components, connections and forward movement
  • identify whether their text contains a clear argument
Booking available soon

Pitch perfect: public speaking, networking & engaging

Date: Thu 24 Oct 2019
Time: 10.00-13.00

Course mapped to

Vitae's Researcher Development Framework domains: C1 (Professional conduct), D2 (Communication and dissemination)

Presenters

Dr Joanna Young

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

C5 Seminar Room, Bute Building - This venue does not have full mobility access. If you have any access requirements, please contact CAPOD direct at coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Course information

Researchers are frequently under pressure to communicate their information verbally, whether it is an oral presentation, in a meeting or an interaction at a conference. Performing well in a keynote presentation or impressing at a chance meeting is key to facilitating collaborations, building relationships with future employers and boosting your career. Public speaking and networking are key components to a successful career, both within academia and beyond.

This workshop will cover various situations that researchers are faced with regularly with regard to verbal interaction. We will cover oral presentations, short communications, how to pitch your research and how to network effectively. Participants will be introduced to various techniques that they can use and adapt to a variety of situations: how do you respond to difficult questions? How do you effectively engage with senior academics?

Effective verbal delivery and engagement takes practice and this workshop will introduce participants to concepts and techniques that they can use to their advantage. We take a step by step approach to presentations, building up from initial short research pitches to longer conference talks so participants can gain confidence.

Aims and objectives

By the end of this workshop you should be able to:

•     been introduced to a series of techniques to aid and structure their presentations; 


•     an understanding of how to present & engage with various audiences; 


•     gained confidence with regard to delivering effective presentations. 


Practical public engagement

Date: Fri 25 Oct 2019
Time: 09.00-12.00
Programme: Public Engagement Portfolio - Academic & Research Staff
Programme: Public Engagement Portfolio - PGRs
Programme: Public Engagement Portfolio - Professional Staff
Programme: Passport to Research Futures
Key details: A hands-on practical workshop and surgery to inspire confidence in your public engagement communication and develop innovative approaches to communicating your research.

Target audience

Research postgraduates and staff from any discipline.

Course pre-work

Please give consideration to what you want to achieve with your public engagement and whom you want to engage with. Come prepared to communicate!

Course mapped to

Vitae's Researcher Development Framework domains: D1 (Working with others), D2 (Communication and dissemination), D3 (Engagement and impact)

Presenters

Dr Mhairi Stewart

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Course information

This GRADskills workshop will start with a variety of simple exercises designed to help you communicate your research directly to non-specialist audiences. From there we will look at the variety of audiences and delivery possibilities for engagement locally, nationally and globally.

We will briefly consider public engagement as a pathway to impact and how to design evaluation as proof of impact. Those who wish to can arrange to meet with Mhairi at a later date to develop individual public engagement plans.

What previous participants have said about this course:

  • "Helps to ask questions to the person on public engagement here."

  • "Inspiring speaker, who throughout the workshop put what she taught us re: public speaking into practice with constant interaction, anecdotes, etc."

  • "Good conversation on a variety of topics with researchers in a variety of fields.  Gained a clearer understanding of PE [public engagement]."

  • "I liked how practical the event was. The activity where we had to present our research on the spot was useful."

Aims and objectives

By the end of this workshop you should be able to:

  • Confidently deliver simple, established public engagement exercises such as ‘Meet the Expert’.
  • Describe your research in conversational terms to non-specialists in 4 sentences or less.
  • Start developing a research and/or project specific plan for public engagement delivery.
  • Discover opportunities for public engagement delivery locally, nationally and globally.
Booking available soon

Writing well: language and style

Date: Wed 30 Oct 2019
Time: 10.00-13.00
Key details: Particularly helpful in the latter half of your PhD as you start writing your thesis, or for publication. Please bring a short piece of (your own) academic writing to this workshop. Work in progress is fine.

Target audience

PhD students in the latter half of their studies, or research staff with limited writing experience.

Course pre-work

Please bring a short piece of (your own) academic writing to this workshop. Work in progress is fine.

Course mapped to

Vitae's Researcher Development Framework domains: A1 (Knowledge base), D2 (Communication and dissemination)

Presenters

Dr Mimo Caenepeel

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

C5 Seminar Room, Bute Building - This venue does not have full mobility access. If you have any access requirements, please contact CAPOD direct at coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Course information

This workshop focuses on stylistic aspects of writing. What gives writing that elusive quality of ‘flow’? Can academic writing be ‘stylish’? We will look at the mechanics of building sentences and analyse, by means of examples, what helps or hinders the reading process. We will also explore punctuation and how it supports clear thinking.

To attend this workshop, you need to bring a short piece of (your own) writing to work with. Bring printed copy if possible.

What previous participants have said about this course:

  • "It will give you a grasp of what clear and good writing is like in English, and how you can make changes to your own writing to improve it."
  • "Good for drawing attention to the subtleties of style."
  • "You can't fix a problem if you don't even know it exists / have the words to describe it."

Aims and objectives

By the end of this workshop participants should be able to:

  • identify linguistic properties of a text that affect style
  • apply some essential rules for building well-written sentences in English
  • describe the role of different punctuation marks

Information Matters

Date: Thu 31 Oct 2019
Time: 0930-1215
Programme: Passport to Administrative Excellence

Target audience

Administrative Staff in schools and other administrative units

Presenters

Various University staff

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

C5 Seminar Room, Bute Building - This venue does not have full mobility access. If you have any access requirements, please contact CAPOD direct at coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Course information

This course is designed to provide up-to-date information with regard to the key student administrative information and requirements.  The method of delivery will look at what is required at different stages of the student journey:  before, during and after their time at St Andrews.  The course structure will be interactive and will enable the sharing of current knowledge and the opportunity to ask questions.

Presentations will be given by staff from the following units:

Admissions

Registry

Careers

Alumni Relations

Student Services.

 

 

 

Aims and objectives

Objectives

  • Raise awareness of the key current information practice and requirements as they relate to the student journey
  • Bridge the knowledge gaps between Schools and Units
Booking available soon

Academic writer - creative writer?

Date: Wed 6 Nov 2019
Time: 10.00-13.00
Key details: Please bring a piece of writing that you're working on at the moment, and a laptop.

Course pre-work

Please bring a piece of writing that you’re working on at the moment, and a laptop.

Course mapped to

Vitae's Researcher Development Framework domains: C1 (Professional conduct), D2 (Communication and dissemination)

Presenters

Dr Mimo Caenepeel

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

C5 Seminar Room, Bute Building - This venue does not have full mobility access. If you have any access requirements, please contact CAPOD direct at coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Course information

Academic writers and creative writers sometimes appear to be at opposite ends of a long spectrum. Do skills and techniques employed by fiction writers have any relevance for academic writing? Could writing creatively, even occasionally, enrich your academic work (as well as your life)? In this workshop we explore some of the creative writer’s toolkit through short writing exercises that initially take us outside the realm of academic writing, and eventually back into it.

Please bring a piece of writing that you’re working on at the moment, and a laptop.

What previous participants have said about this course:

  • "The creative writing exercises were fun and thought-provoking. Good for personal development."
  • "This workshop will make you want to write & engage your readers in a much more meaningful way. Highly recommend."
  • "It was a lot of fun & made me enjoy writing again."

Aims and objectives

By the end of the workshop, you should be able to:

  • Identify productivity habits and tools commonly adopted creative writers, and put them into practice
  • Apply crafting techniques of creative writers and explore their potential (and limits) for academic writers
  • Move (a little bit) out of your comfort zone when it comes to writing, both in academic and in other contexts
Booking available soon

Writing abstracts

Date: Tue 12 Nov 2019
Time: 10.00-13.00
Key details: Find out about how to write effective and informative abstracts. You will need to bring some notes or a draft version of an article you are working on, as well as your laptop.

Target audience

Research postgraduate students in the latter half of your studies.

Course mapped to

Vitae's Researcher Development Framework domains: A1 (Knowledge base), D2 (Communication and dissemination)

Presenters

Dr Mimo Caenepeel

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

C5 Seminar Room, Bute Building - This venue does not have full mobility access. If you have any access requirements, please contact CAPOD direct at coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Course information

Abstracts are small bits of texts that have a big impact. Come to this workshop if you want to learn how to write an abstract that will inform and engage the readers you want to reach. You will work on producing and editing an abstract, experimenting with different choices in terms of content and style. We will also look at titles, and compare the role of abstracts with that of introductions and conclusions.

Bring some notes or a draft of a paper or thesis chapter you are working on, as well as your laptop.

What previous participants have said about this course:

  • "Very relevant for those publishing or applying for conferences."
  • "Important course for your writing."
  • "Mimo's workshops are always really worth attending."
  • "It is very practical, hands-on."

Aims and objectives

By the end of this workshop participants should be able to:

  • identify what good abstracts have in common, and how they may differ across disciplines
  • produce and re-work an abstract in different ways
  • offer alternatives for a particular title, reflecting on the effect of the changes
  • describe the difference, both in content and function, between abstracts, introductions and conclusions.
Booking available soon

Speak up for success: Voice coaching for everyone

Date: Thu 14 Nov 2019
Time: 09.30-12.30
Programme: Public Engagement Portfolio - PGRs
Key details: Especially relevant for nervous or shy speakers. No talking in front of others required, group work is optional. Bring headphones/ear buds and a phone, laptop or ipad to record your own voice on. Mics will be provided.

Target audience

Postgraduate students in all disciplines and at any year of study.

Course pre-work

Please try record yourself reading some of your work and listen back and critique your voice for things you would like to improve. Bring these suggestions for improvement to the workshop if you can. Please bring headphones/ear buds and a phone, laptop or ipad to the workshop to record your voice. Mics will be provided.

Course mapped to

Vitae's Researcher Development Framework domain: B1 (Personal qualities), D2 (Communication and dissemination)

Presenters

Kate Smith

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

C5 Seminar Room, Bute Building - This venue does not have full mobility access. If you have any access requirements, please contact CAPOD direct at coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Course information

Since listeners pay attention to how things are said as well as what is said, this course coaches you to achieve that professional broadcast and public speaking standard that gets your brilliant ideas across and allows you to feel so comfortable speaking that you can focus on your talk or conversation. No talking in front of others needed and group work is optional. Nervous or shy speakers especially welcome.

If the thought of talking in public or speaking without notes makes you shiver, then this is the course for you. Or perhaps you are already a confident speaker but would like to learn some techniques to improve your range or pace? The course will cover speaking smoothly, tone, breathing, developing a resonant voice and also how to make nerves disappear. The coaching will cover speaking to large groups and also speaking assuredly and formally to smaller audiences, such as conference break out groups or networking.

Microphone techniques are also covered to enable confident speaking on radio/TV/podcasts including TED talks. The unique blend of tips and techniques are drawn from broadcast journalism, public speaking, singing exercises and stand-up comedy.

Please bring headphones/ear buds and a phone, laptop or ipad to record your own voice on. Mics will be provided.

What previous participants have said about this course:

  • "Excellent event.  Must attend for all those who have to do public speaking."
  • "Every topic was useful as it touched on areas that were the source of my weaknesses from which I have benefited a lot."
  • "It's certainly worth attending, particularly if you're a nervous speaker.  Focus is on practical tips to help you sound better."

Aims and objectives

By the end of this workshop you should be able to:

  • Control the pace, tone and volume of your voice to communicate clearly.
  • Control nerves and prevent nerves from affecting your voice.
  • Use professional techniques for speaking in public.
  • Use professional techniques for recording voice for broadcast.
  • Use professional techniques for speaking formally with a small group.
Booking available soon

Figures, images & visualising information

Date: Fri 15 Nov 2019
Time: 10.00-13.00
Key details: Find out how to enhance your science research papers, thesis, conference posters and presentations with accurate and clear visual representations. Laptop or mobile device helpful but not essential.

Target audience

PhD students and early career staff in all disciplines, but note the presentation is more science focused.

Course pre-work

It is helpful but not essential if you can bring a laptop or mobile device to the workshop, if you wish to experiment with the techniques being demonstrated.

Course mapped to

Vitae's Researcher Development Framework domains: A1 (Knowledge base), D2 (Communication and dissemination)

Presenters

Dr Joanna Young

Course provider

Website: CAPOD

Email: coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Venue

C5 Seminar Room, Bute Building - This venue does not have full mobility access. If you have any access requirements, please contact CAPOD direct at coursescapod@st-andrews.ac.uk

Course information

Displaying information in a visual format is a excellent way for researchers to communicate their work. You can enhance your research papers, thesis, conference posters, presentations and public engagement activities with accurate and clear visual representations. This workshop is designed to introduce participants to various types of visual formats including standard graphs, information visualisations and graphics for publication.

There are a number of different ways to display your data or ideas visually and it depends on who you are aiming to engage and what you want to tell them. How do you decide which format is best and how much time does it take? What story can your data tell? What style of image is suitable for a particular publication? There are a vast number of digital tools available that allow you to build engaging graphics. Building excellent graphics and summary figures takes time, practice and a willingness to learn the appropriate software. This workshop will provide a list of tools and further resources for participants to explore in their own time.**

Data and information visualisation is a vast and rapidly growing field. This workshop covers the principles of visualising data, examples of excellent visualisations and poor visualisations and case studies including examples from the instructor’s own publications and experience. This workshop is suitable for students and early career researchers.

In addition, you will be encouraged to explore patterns and connections in some examples which you will present back to the class as part of a group. This workshop is suitable for students and early career researchers.

**Please note this is not a software course, participants will not be shown any specific tools as that goes beyond the scope of this workshop. However, they will be given a list of the different types of data visualisation software to research in their own time.

What previous participants have said about this course:

  • "Gives basics of good design. Demonstrates different kinds of tools to use."
  • "Nice overview of data presentation."
  • "All information is very helpful! Thank you for your excellent lesson!"