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Research seminars: April 2018

Monday 2 April 2018
“The Laughing Philosopher” in Costume as Persian Mystic: Whitman’s Iconography in Iran
Addressing Walt Whitman’s reception in Iran, the present essay focuses on the front cover of a book-length translation of Whitman into Persian to study how Whitman’s image is visually translated for an Iranian audience. Among literary discourses of contemporary Iran, the one which associates poetry with mysticism plays the most significant role in this translation.

Dr Behnam Mirzababazadeh Fomeshi
Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Research Fellow
https://behnammirzababazadehfomeshi.academia.edu/
4pm, B215

Tuesday, 3 April 2018

Public lecture
How I became a writer, thanks to my mother, Franco and Simone de Beauvoir.
Laura Freixas, writer in residence
http://modlangswritersinresidence.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/
4.00-5.30pm Byre Studio

Wednesday 4 April 2018
Weekly Middle Eastern Film Screenings
As Simple as That (Reza Mirkarimi, 2008)
1h 34min, in Persian with English subtitles
'As Simple as That' is the touching portrait of an under-appreciated and unfulfilled woman's loneliness. Tahereh goes about her day, quietly attending to the demands of family and neighbors while her own low spirits go unnoticed. As her sense of isolation becomes more profound, even the brief glimpses of happiness she catches through her children seem to mark her search for meaning in her own life. The film captures Tahereh’s emotional state with an understated finesse. Celebrated at multiple film festivals across the world, this is a film of great poignancy and beauty.
3pm, Buchanan Building, room B103

Wednesday 4 April 2018
Institute for Contemporary & Comparative Literature (ICCL) Seminar Series
Comparative Literature and…
Dr Florian Mussgnug (Italian and Comparative Literature, UCL)
Planetary Figurations: World Literature, Indiscipline, and the Future of Higher Education
This lecture explores the long history of multidisciplinary approaches in Comparative Literature, from the Bernheimer Report to recent debates about “Indiscipline”. I will suggest that comparison is fundamental to all forms of cross-disciplinary inquiry and that debates about world literature mark a vital rallying point for the Arts and Humanities, beyond traditional disciplinary lines. In this context, I will highlight the growing importance of theories of genre and will argue that attention to transnational genres, far from valorising global sameness, offers a way to foster cultural difference and the specific expertise of Modern Languages subjects vis-à-vis Global English.
4pm, B216

Wednesday 4 April 2018
Austrian Shorts is a short film series, screening 2018’s short film nominees for the Austrian Film Award (Österreichischer Filmpreis). The UK OeAD lecturers and the Austrian Cultural Forum London are proud to present a collection of short films which is screened at eight universities all over the UK in March and April 2018. The screenings are free of charge and with English subtitles.
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
School II (St Salvator's Quad)

Thursday 5 April 2018
School of Modern Languages Research Seminar Series
Conflict and Change
‘Slanguages: Co-Creating a Touring Multilingual Visual Arts Exhibition’
Professor Rajindar Dudrah, University of Birmingham
4-5.30pm, School V, St Salvator's Quadrangle

Wednesday 11 April 2018
Weekly Middle Eastern Film Screenings
The Lizard (Kamal Tabrizi, 2004)
1h 55min, in Persian with English subtitles
Kamal Tabrizi's satire on the clergy in post-revolutionary Iran won widespread acclaim, and its popularity continues among Iranians to this day. While in prison, petty criminal Reza comes across a clergyman. Reza soon dons his new acquaintance's clerical robes and makes a bid for freedom. However, Reza soon learns that being a clergyman brings little respect from the public at large. Many Iranians going about their daily lives in the capital want little to do with the clergymen, many of whom enjoy positions of high authority within the country. Reza travels to the outlying villages, from where he plots to escape the country. However, his plans must be put on hold when the villagers accept Reza into their community and expect him to perform religious duties. Will Reza's prison break transform him into an unlikely pillar of the community?
3pm, Buchanan Building, room B103

 

Wednesday 11 April 2018
Byre World
Human Zoos: The Couple in the Cage (dir. Coco Fusco and Paula Heredia, 1993)
The Couple in the Cage documents the travelling performance of Guillermo Gómez-Peña and Coco Fusco in which they exhibited themselves as caged Amerindians from an imaginary island.  The screening complements the exhibition “Human Zoos: Putting People on Display” at the Byre (9 April to 7 May).
The film will be introduced by Dr Leshu Torchin and is supported by the Centre for Film Studies, University of St Andrews.
6pm, Byre Theatre, Studio

Thursday 12 April 2018
School of Modern Languages Research Seminar Series
Conflict and Change
‘Pressurizing the Politics of The Crucible: The Possibilities of a Dialectical, Brechtian Production’
Professor David Barnett, University of York
4-5.30pm, School V, St Salvator's Quadrangle

Monday 16 April 2018
Centre for Russian, Soviet, Central and Eastern European Studies (CRSCEES)
Ira Roldugina (University of Oxford)
Speaking For Themselves: Early Soviet Queer Agenda From Below
5pm, Buchanan Building, room 305

Tuesday 17 April 2018
Organised by the School of History in conjunction with the Centre for Russian, Soviet, Central and East European Studies (CRSCEES)
Professor Motoki Nomachi (Slavic-Eurasion Research Centre, Hokkaido University, Japan)
"The Break-Up of Serbo-Croation and the Gorani of Kosovo"
5.15pm, room 1.10, School of History, The Scores, St Katharine's Lodge

Wednesday 18 April 2018
C19c Brown paper-bag research seminar series 2017-18
“Sharing a 19th-Century Object and/or Concept”
Object: Illustrations of flowers from translation anthologies
Concept: German Naturalism
Andrew Cusack and Michael White, School of Modern Languages
Andrew will explore the Translation Anthology in 19th-Century Europe and what forms did collections of the ‘flowers’ of the lyric poetry of nations (anthologia, Blumenlese) take and what functions did they fulfil. Starting with pictures of some translation anthologies from Germany and the UK the aim is to get answers to questions of form and function from across Europe. Michael will reflect, in contrast, on character and authority (and adultery) in German Naturalist Drama”
1-2pm, Byre Conference Room

Wednesday 18 April 2018
Weekly Middle Eastern Film Screenings
Tehran Has No More Pomegranates (Massoud Bakhshi, 2007)
1h 8min, in Persian with English subtitles
This is the story of Tehran from the Qajar time (middle of 19th century) to today. Tehran has become a metropolis from a small village, now a developed city with many social problems.
3pm, Buchanan Building, room B103

 

Wednesday 18 April 2018
Institute for Contemporary & Comparative Literature (ICCL) Seminar Series
Comparative Literature and…
Dr Graeme Macdonald (English & Comparative Literary Studies, Univ. of Warwick)
Comparative Literature and Petroculture/Energy Humanities
This paper will consider how the recent rise to prominence of the intersecting fields of Petroculture and the Energy Humanities pose new and vital questions for comparative literary studies. Using a series of examples from international petrofiction, the paper considers how refurbished comparativist rubrics and protocols – in relation to emergent outlooks on world-literature – offer the most effective means to realise literature’s registration of carbon-driven modernity, framed as it is by environmental concern and climate breakdown.
4pm, B216

Thursday 19 April 2018
School of Modern Languages Research Seminar Series
Conflict and Change
‘The Concept of the Transformational Leap in the History of Russian Culture’
Dr Andrei Zorin, University of Oxford
4-5.30pm, School V, St Salvator's Quadrangle

Monday 23 April 2018
C19c Brown paper-bag research seminar series 2017-18
“Sharing a 19th-Century Object and/or Concept”
Object: Maps
Bernhard Struck, School of History & Mary Orr, School of Modern Languages
Bernhard will discuss a concrete map, sharing his findings on cartography in the 19th century and his work on "Mapping Germanies. Cartography, Territories and National Spaces, 1770s-1880s". Mary will analyse a ‘map’ of  Bathurst (1823) in Mrs Bowdich’s scientific travel narrative Excursions to Madeira and Porto Santo, 1825 (English Ed.; 1826 French ed.), and explore the question of locating female and non-colonial map-makers.
1-2pm, Buchanan Building, Room 305

 

Monday 23 April 2018
When Nora cooks Persian Food: Realistic Strategies in the Iranian Screen Adaptation of Ibsen’s A Doll’s House
Regarded as the pioneer of the New Wave of Iranian Cinema, Dariush Mehrjui (1940-) is among the most acclaimed Iranian filmmakers. Besides his original cinematic style, Mehrjui is also well-known for his adaptations. In fact, he is the only Iranian filmmaker who has constantly focused on adaptation of literary works from Persian and world literature. The present paper focuses on Sara (1992), Mehrjui’s adaptation of Ibsen’s A Doll’s House (1879). Approaching the question of cross-cultural adaptation from the viewpoint of theorists such as Robert Stam and Linda Hutehcon, the paper reads Sara as a cultural translation and/or ‘indigenization’. Through close readings of the film, the paper sheds light on the ways the Norwegian cultural values of Ibsen’s time, particularly those related to sexuality and gender roles, have been appropriated and indigenized through a creative use of food, material culture and sensual elements, resulting in a more realistic rewriting of Ibsen’s play into contemporary Iranian society.
Adineh Khoajstehpour
4pm, B215

Tuesday 24 April 2018
Institute for Contemporary & Comparative Literature (ICCL) Seminar Series
Comparative Literature and…
Prof Charles Forsdick (French, University of Liverpool)
World-literature in French: from travel to migration
The hyphenation of littérature-monde – the most common French rendering of ‘world literature’ – is often associated with that in the Tout-Monde of Edouard Glissant, and is related as a result with Caribbean thought. It is reminiscent also, however, of an earlier term, économie-monde, first proposed by Fernand Braudel in the context of the history of the Mediterranean. The paper considers the emergence of world-literature in French in relation to the regimes of mobility in the spaces of the Mediterranean. It tracks shifts in the littérature-monde movement, from early (and predominantly depoliticized) emphases on travel writing in the work of authors such as Jacques Lacarrière to a more recent engagement with contemporary trans-Mediterranean migration in works such as Patrick Chamoiseau’s Frères migrants. The paper asks whether such developments constitute a form of continuity regarding the association of literature and mobility, or reflect instead a different form of commitment to literature and human rights.
4pm, St Salvator's Quad 30

Wednesday 25 April 2018
Weekly Middle Eastern Film Screenings
The Salesman (Asghar Farhadi, 2016)
1h 55min, Persian with in English subtitles
While both participating in a production of "Death of a Salesman," a teacher's wife is assaulted in her new home, which leaves him determined to find the perpetrator over his wife's traumatized objections.
3pm, Buchanan Building, room B103

Wednesday 25 April 2018
Byre World
Human Zoos in Scotland
The World Fairs and International Exhibitions that recorded human achievements, scientific and industrial innovations, and introduced visitors to other cultures and peoples are most readily associated with Paris, Chicago and London. Yet Scotland hosted its own flurry of shows in the early 1900s, and even held one of the last fairs in Europe, the famous Empire Exhibition of Glasgow, in 1938. These shows were controversial, since they often saw people shipped across the world to perform stereotypically ‘indigenous’ rituals or produce craftwork for the amusement of visitors.
This illustrated talk by Dr Emma Bond (Dept of Italian, University of St Andrews) complements the “Human Zoos: Putting People on Display” exhibition at the Byre (9 April – 7 May) and will explore the stories behind the images displayed in the exhibition posters, which all relate to ethnographic displays that took place in Scottish cities just one hundred years ago, from alleged romances between Somali villagers on display in Portobello to the feats of Buffalo Bill in Glasgow.
6pm, Byre Theatre, Studio

Thursday 26 April 2018
School of Modern Languages Research Seminar Series
Conflict and Change
‘Digital transformations in Modern Languages research’
Dr Paul Spence, King’s College, London
4-5.30pm, School V, St Salvator's Quadrangle

Friday 27 April 2018
Centre for Russian, Soviet, Central and Eastern European Studies (CRSCEES)
Leonid Parfenov
Screening and Discussion: Russian Jews (2014 - 2016)
4.30 - 7.00 pm, The Byre Theatre, Studio

Monday 30 April 2018
Institute for Contemporary & Comparative Literature (ICCL) Seminar Series
Comparative Literature and…
Prof Loredana Polezzi (Translation Studies, Cardiff University)
From duality to mobility: translation, comparison and transnational circulation:
As cognate disciplinary fields, both Translation Studies and Comparative Literature are built on the tension between similarity and difference, between notions of separation (of languages, cultures, literary canons, …) and connectedness. Looking at specific examples taken from the history of Italian mobilities, I will examine the way in which recent thinking about translation calls into question the ‘silos model’ of cultural and linguistic interaction, replacing it with a new interpretation of the ‘translation continuum’ and of the way in which translation is woven into the fabric of cultural production.
3pm, Quad 31