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Research seminars: April-May 2016

6 April 2016
Weekly Middle Eastern Film Screenings
Facing Mirrors (2011)
By Negar Azarbayjani
Iran – 102 min, In Persian with English subtitles
On Wednesdays at 3pm, Buchanan Building, room 305

6 April 2016
Institute of European and Cultural Identity Studies (IECIS) Research Seminar
In collaboration with the School of Art History
Dr Alixe Bovey (Courtauld Institute of Art)
'Miniature Giants: Paradoxical Scale in the material history of London's Gogmagog and Corineus'
4pm, St Salvator's Quadrangle, School 1

6 April 2016
Byre World Film Series
'Stalker' (1979), Andrei Tarkovski (Soviet Union)
Russian with English subtitles
2:30pm, The Byre Theatre

Wednesday 06th April 2016 (5pm in B215):

Jacopo Colombini (Department of Italian):
'Lampedusa in Hamburg and Berlin: Re-­‐representing Lampedusa in a Transnational Context'

Maria Gracia Rodriguez Fernandez (Department of Spanish):
TBC

7 April 2016
School of Modern Languages Research Seminar Series
Prof Jeremy Robbins (Edinburgh)
'Cervantes' Last Words'
5pm, Buchanan Building, room 216

8 April 2016
Arabic & Persian Research Seminar
Dr Francesco Binaghi (Research Fellow in Classical Arabic)
ERC Project “Language - Philology - Culture: Arab Cultural Semantics in Transition"
https://arts.st-andrews.ac.uk/arsem/
The Western Legacy of a Marginalised Eastern Grammarian: Problems, Reinterpretations and Evolutions within the Arabic Linguistic Tradition with the Example of the "ḥurūf" kāna wa-ʾaḫawātu-hā
5pm, Buchanan Building, room 216

11 April 2016
CRSCEES Research Seminar
Prof Dina Iordanova (Film Studies, St Andrews)
'Breaking Through Walls and Discourses: History for Losers'
5pm, Buchanan Building, room 216

13 April 2016
Weekly Middle Eastern Film Screenings
A Separation (2011)
By Asghar Farhadi
Iran – 97 min, In Persian with English subtitles
On Wednesdays at 3pm, Buchanan Building, room 305

14 April 2016
School of Modern Languages Research Seminar Series
Dr Tom O’Connor (Maynooth)
'The Spanish Inquisition and the Assimilation of Early Eighteenth-Century British Migrants'
5pm, Buchanan Building, room 216

15 April 2016
Manuel Sartori (Aix-en-Provence) 
"Determination and Definition in Medieval Arabic Grammatical Thought”
The talk will deal with terminological evolution and, more specifically, with the evolution of the relationship between Definition and Determination within the medieval Arabic grammatical thought.
5pm, Buchanan Building, room 216

20 April 2016
Byre World Literary Café Series
‘The (useless) craft of poetry’, with Prof. Jordi Larios (University of St Andrews)
8pm, The Byre Theatre

20 April 2016
Weekly Middle Eastern Film Screenings
Don't Be Tired (2014) By Mohsen Gharaie, Afshin Hashemi
Iran – 93 min, In Persian with English subtitles
On Wednesdays at 3pm, Buchanan Building, room 305

20 April 2016
Dr Caterina Calafat (Universitat de les Illes Balears)
Je suis autre moy-mesmes: Generic Blending and French Heritage in Julian Barnes’s Levels of Life’. 
5pm, Buchanan Building, room 216

Wednesday 20th April 2016 (5pm in Arts Seminar 5):

Tiran Manucharyan (Department of Arabic & Persian Studies):
'Abū al-ʿIlā al-Salāmūnī: the rewriting of history in the Egyptian theatre in the 1970-80s'

Karen Brown (Department of Spanish)
"Creatively Contained or Culturally Constrained?: A closer look at the Waldeen translations of Neruda's Canto general"

21 April 2016
School of Modern Languages Research Seminar Series
Dr Kate Tunstall (Oxford)
‘Et même des magots’: the politics and æsthetics of luxury in eighteenth-century France
5pm, Buchanan Building, room 216

21 April 2016
Comparative Literature Research Seminar
Prof. Richard Bradford (Ulster)
IS IT ANY GOOD? THE QUESTION ACADEMICS NEVER ASK ABOUT LITERARY WORKS’
‘What is wrong with literary studies?’ Richard Bradford asks, and reaches a straightforward conclusion. It  refuses to  address the questions that inform all other  aspects of literary culture, from decisions made  by commissioning editors when faced by an as yet unpublished novel  or a collection of verse, through assessments by  reviewers and members of  book clubs, to the choice made by the casual reader flicking through the  opening  pages of a thriller in a  bookshop: is it  any good? It is quite possible that an undergraduate might wonder why exactly Shakespeare has achieved godlike status. Their tutors will certainly not encourage them to take a sceptical approach to the inalienable greatness of the Bard. The  same constraint obtains for the  rest  of  the major  figures in the  undergraduate  curriculum, and even at  the  other  end of the  spectrum, in modules on say Popular Fiction or Crime Writing, the question of why  such works  belong in a minor colony  of the greater empire of  the canon is not addressed. Are they by their nature inferior? If so, what does literary High Art amount toWhy is the academic study of literature so disconnected from the real world of books and reading? Theory, in its various manifestations, has played a part: over the past forty years the notions of aesthetics and qualitative discrimination have been written off as bourgeois delusions, and even the idea that we can ‘define’ literature (a basic prerequisite for assessing the skill of its practitioners) has been systematically dismissed
Can we remedy this problem? Do come and say your piece: Richard has promised to be brief, and polemical, before shifting to an open debate.
Late last year he published ‘Is Shakespeare Any Good? And Other Questions on How to Evaluate Literature’ (Blackwell/Wiley https://www.timeshighereducation.com/opinion/is-shakespeare-any-good) and is currently planning an AHRC Networking Scheme application on the topic of Evaluating Literature. He will be happy to discuss the latter with all who have an interest.
5pm, Buchanan Building, room 312

27 April 2016
German Research Seminar
Emily Oliver
"East German Shakespeare and Nostalgia in Performance Criticism"
Elizabeth Stewart
"Offending the Audience? Feridun Zaimoglu’s  Othello at the Münchner Kammerspiele (2003)"
4pm, Buchanan Building, room 312

4 May 2016
Byre World Film Series
'Wolf' (2013), Jim Taihuttu (The Netherlands)
Dutch with English subtitles
7pm, The Byre Theatre

5 May 2016
CRSCEES Research Seminar
Prof Mitja Velikonja (Cultural and Religious Studies, University of Ljubljana)
"Rock n' Retro": Yugoslav and Partisan Motifs in Contemporary Slovenian Music'
5pm, Buchanan Building, room 216

10 May 2016
Cultural Memory Research Seminar
Dr Cara Levey (University College Cork)
"Generation Next: Postmemorial Affiliations and Activism in Post-dictatorship Argentina and Uruguay"
5pm, Buchanan Building room 216

11 May 2016
Persian Research Events
Dr Niloofar Kakhi, Visiting Research Fellow, Institute of Iranian Studies
Towards the formation of a ‘representative’ architecture: the role of archaeology in formation of architectural histories in Iran
Since the early twentieth century, the primary question that dominated the Iranian architectural circles has not been ‘how to create the perfect building’, but ‘how to design, Iranian’. This has also been the most critical point of concern in every encounter between the architects and the Iranian governments for the past hundred years. Despite the arrival of modernist architecture along with the extensive modernising plans of the early twentieth century what has been considered as the representation of Iranian national identity in the field of architecture, has been dominated by the incorporation of visual historic references into the design of new buildings. Yet, what Iranian architects know of such historic references is in itself a highly political matter and based on a very particular way that this knowledge was transmitted from archaeology to architecture. This presentation will look at the early stages of the production of architectural knowledge in Iran between the 1920s and 1940s and traces the ways in which archaeology has shaped architectural history and the discourse of national architecture in Iran.

5pm, Buchanan Building, room 312

12 May 2016
Prof Barbara Havercroft (Toronto)
Society for French Studies Visiting International Fellowship Lecture ‘“Unspeakable” Wounds: Personal Trauma in Contemporary French Women’s Autobiographical Writings’,  followed by a wine reception at the Byre Theatre. Event open to all, sponsored by the Society for French Studies, the School of Modern Languages and the Institute for Contemporary and Comparative Literature.
5pm, St Salvator's Quadrangle, School V

18 May 2016
Byre World Literary Café Series
Dr Boris Dralyuk (University of St Andrews), reading his translations of Russian literature
8pm, The Byre Theatre

1 June 2016
CRSCEES Research Seminar
Justyna Beinek (Sewanee: The University of the South, USA)
“There Is No Such City as London”: The Idea of “The West” in Polish Film Pre- and Post-1989
This lecture explores the idea of “the West” as a cultural category in post-communist Polish cinema vis-à-vis censored, yet surprisingly frequent, mentions of the West in Polish film 1945-89. The idea of the West as an almost mythological locus of abundance, wealth, freedom, high but also fashionable pop culture, and general “superiority” – a phenomenon which can be observed across time in Polish post-war cultural history, as well as film history – has not yet evolved in a significant way, despite the fall of communism in 1989 and the 2004 accession to the European Union. Although the images of the West in pre- and post-1989 film are diverse and context-/genre-specific, most of them seem to be grounded in an underlying cultural framework of Poland’s polarized attitude toward the West that partakes in resentment and fascination in equal measure. In his Diaries from the 1950s-60s, Witold Gombrowicz warns Poles: “Do not waste your precious time in pursuit of Europe. You will never catch up with her.” But today, 27 years after the fall of communism, when Poland has already “caught up to the West,” the cultural mythology still dominates the cinematic discourse of the West.
Bio:
A native of Poland, Dr. Justyna Beinek received her Ph.D. in Slavic Languages and Literatures from Harvard University and a master’s degree in Comparative Literature from the University of California San Diego. Since 2013 she has taught in the Department of Russian and in the International and Global Studies Program at Sewanee: the University of the South (Tennessee, USA), where she also directs the Mellon Globalization Forum. Previously she had taught at Indiana University, the University of Toronto, and New York University. Her research and teaching interests include comparative literature, Russian and Polish literatures and cultures, Romanticism, film studies, gender studies, as well as post-communist cultures and memory/identity politics. Her co-edited volume of essays titled Re-mapping Polish-German Memory: Geographical, Cultural, and Political Space since World War II, was published in 2012. Her monograph on early nineteenth-century scrapbooks, Portable Graveyards: Russian and Polish Albums in the Age of Romanticism, is forthcoming. Dr. Beinek’s current research project focuses on the idea of “The West” as functioning in East European cultures, a project for which she has received a Fulbright research grant in 2013-14.
4pm, St Salvator's Quad room 36

Wednesday 06th April 2016 (5pm in B215):

Jacopo Colombini

(Deptartment of Italian) 
'Lampedusa in Hamburg: Re‐representing Lampedusa in a Transnational Context'

And:

María Gracia Rodríguez Fernández

(Deparment of Spanish; visiting this semester from the University of Granada)
'Jaime Gil de Biedma and the Anglo-American influence in his poetry'

Tea/coffee and cake will be provided! All are welcome.  

PG Seminar 6 April 2016 (PDF, 272 KB)

Wednesday 20th April 2016 (5pm in Arts Seminar 5):

Tiran Manucharyan (Department of Arabic & Persian Studies):
'Abū al-ʿIlā al-Salāmūnī: the rewriting of history in the Egyptian theatre in the 1970-80s'

Karen Brown (Department of Spanish)
"Creatively Contained or Culturally Constrained?: A closer look at the Waldeen translations of Neruda's Canto general"