ME3309 Mediaeval St Andrews
   
Lecturer
Dr Christine McGladdery (Room 18, 71 South Street)
   
Credits 30
   
Availability Semester 1, 2017-18
   
Class Hour View Timetable
   
Description
St Andrews was of unique importance in the Middle Ages. It was the principal centre of the Scottish church, a pilgrim site of international significance, and the home of the first university in Scotland (and third in Britain after Oxford and Cambridge). It is also an excellent example of a mediaeval town. This module will explore the history of mediaeval St Andrews and consider this in relation to developments across mediaeval Europe. The module will draw on written historical sources, including those held by the Library's Special Collections, and utilise the outstanding local access to relevant material culture.
   

Basic Reading


Michael Brown and Katie Stevenson (eds), Medieval St Andrews: Church, Cult, City (St Andrews Studies in Scottish History, 2017)

John Higgitt (ed.), Medieval art and architecture in the diocese of St Andrews (London, 1994)
   

Course Structure

Week 1:           Introduction to Mediaeval St Andrews
Week 2:           Pictish Origins
Week 3:           The Church of St Andrews in the Age of Reform
Week 4:           The Bishops
Week 5:           The Cathedral and the Clergy
Week 6:           Independant learning Week
Week 7:           Development of theMediaeval Burgh
Week 8:           Late Mediaeval Pilgrimage
Week 9:           The University
Week 10:         St Andrews and the Kingdom
Week 11:         Mediaeval St Andrews: Summary and revision

   
Assessment 60% examination - 3-hour paper
40% coursework - 2 x 3000-word essays, 1 x source exercise
   

Learning Outcomes

This module will encourage the ability to assess developments in a well-preserved mediaeval Scottish burgh from various perspectives, using material culture, burgh and ecclesiastical records. The significance of different jurasdictions will be considered as students develop the skill of analysing power structures within political, social and economic frameworks.

   
Restrictions None