Steve Murdoch and Andrew Mackillop (editors)
Fighting for Identity: Scottish Military Experience, 1550-1900   (Brill, Leiden, 2002)  
ISBN 90 04 12833 9

identity

Contents
 
List of Illustrations
List of Abbreviations
List of Contributors
Foreword / Arthur Williamson
Acknowledgements
 
Introduction / Steve Murdoch, Andrew Mackillop
 
  1 James VI and the formation of a Scottish-British Military Identity / Steve Murdoch 27
  2 Beating the Odds: Alexander Leslie's 1640 Campaign in England / Edward Furgol 51
  3 Royalist soldiers and Cromwellian allies? The Cranstoun Regiment in Sweden 1656-1658 / Alexia Grosjean 77
  4 The End of the Scots-Dutch Brigade / Joachim Migglebrink 109
  5 'Tac see ourselves as ithers see us': Scottish Military Identity from the Covenant to Victoria 1637-1837 / Dauvit Horsbroch 117
  6 'His spirit was given only to warre': Conflict and Identity in the Scottish Gaidhealtachd c. 1580-c. 1630 / Aonghas MacCoinnich 143
  7 'Crisis of Identity? Clan Chattan's response to government policy in the Scottish Highlands c. 1580-1609 / Alison Cathcart 173
  8 For King, Country and Regiment? Motive and Identity in Highland Soldiering 1746-1815 / Andrew Mackillop 191
  9 Identity in the Highland Regiments in the Nineteenth Century: Soldier, Region, Nation / Heather Streets 215
  10 Arming and Equipping the Covenanting Armies 1638-1651 / Peter Edwards 245
  11 The press and military conflict in early modern Scotland / Alasdair Mann 271
       
Glossary of Scots and Scottish Gaelic Terms / Dauvit Horsbroch
Index

Reviews

"Fighting for Identity is a step forward in the methodology of writing military history because it applies the theory of disengagement to military consciousness and the identity of the warrior."
Mark C. Fissel, The Journal of Military History, vol. 69:1 (2005)
 
"Fighting for Identity presents important new findings and successfully establishes identity as a key issue for military historiography. The volume should be of great interest to Scottish scholars and to historians of early modern Britain."
Brian Sandberg, The Sixteenth Century Journal, XXXV/4 (2004)
 
The lively research into Scotland’s military past and its influences on the European
Continent has now produced yet two more publications from the University of
Aberdeen and it’s Research Institute of Irish and Scottish Studies. Both the previously
reviewed volume as well as the two new volumes consist of edited collections where
British and other researchers contributed studies illuminating the largely Scottish
military involvement in foreign territories, as well as the wider meaning of this
involvement for Scotland and the countries these Scots were active in. It should be
noted that these are not essays idealising the Scots or over-emphasising the role of
Scots; on the contrary, the reader is met by solid scientific studies of good value,
whose authors have analysed their research and produced important and weighty
additions to the older European history, albeit with the Scots as the point of initiation
Lars Ericson, Militärhistorisk Tidsskrift (2003)

 


 


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