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New Picture House, St Andrews | Dundee Contemporary Arts | Centre for Film Studies | University of St Andrews

New Picture House, St Andrews

Dundee Contemporary Arts

Bolshoi Ballet: La Bayadere

Nikiya, a temple dancer, is in love with the warrior Solor. The High Brahmin pursues Nikiya, and when she rejects him, he plans to take revenge on Solor.

20 Jan: Sun 3pm

Ciné Sunday: Monsters and Men

When a black man is shot dead by police, three members of his community face serious consequences if they reveal their knowledge of the corruption behind his murder, in writer-director Reinaldo Marcus Green’s bracing feature debut.

"…puts a spotlight on a system of fear and misconduct that exists in America."

Set in a sun-dappled Bed-Stuy neighbourhood, we follow three characters affected by the tragedy. Life is good for Manny (Anthony Ramos), a young father who has just landed a new job as a security guard. But when a local man, Big D, is fatally shot while resisting arrest, it is Manny who captures the entire event on his cellphone. He feels morally obligated to share the video, despite knowing that doing so could threaten his family's wellbeing. NYPD officer Dennis (BlacKkKlansman’s John David Washington) is more than familiar with the fine line between police solidarity and corruption but grows increasingly unsettled by his colleagues' insistence that he support the party line when questions are asked about Big D's death. Meanwhile teenager Zyrick (Kelvin Harrison Jr), a high-school basketball prodigy, is drawn to a girl active in the campaign to bring crooked cops to justice. All three men have a lot to lose by getting involved, and maybe even more if they don’t.

Green's interwoven narrative puts a spotlight on a system of fear and misconduct that exists in America, while his filmmaking style implicates us, the audience, in its mirroring of police suspicion. Monsters and Men speaks to one of the most urgent issues of our time: one that affects us all, whether we choose to see it or not.

20 Jan: Sun 11am

Colette

Biopic of French writer Colette (Knightley), focusing on her early years and her wild days in fin-de-siecle Paris after her marriage to Henry Gauthier-Villars (West). Knightley is fantastic as the bisexual icon and the film becomes more playful as it goes on. A pleasurable rite of passage about a woman striving for independence.

18 Jan–31 Jan: Fri Times vary

DCA Film Quiz

Test your film knowledge at this quiz, featuring special prizes. For teams of up to five.

22 Jan: Tue 7pm

DCA Young Photo Club

Skills-building workshop for young photographers with tutored sessions led by local photographers and time to show your work on a big screen. The session begins with a 'how to' introduction to let you try new techniques and familiarise yourself with the camera's settings.

22 Jan–19 Mar: Tue 6–8pm

Discovery's Winter Shorts

Here at DCA we’re big fans of short films for all the family (that’s everyone from the smallest to the tallest) and our annual Discovery Film Festival presents a number of collections of shorts which prove popular year on year. They’re short in length, but big on quality. Usually we show them as part of that year’s collection and then release them back into the wild, never to be seen in Dundee again…

"Short in length, but big on quality…"

However, this year is slightly different. We’ve had a look back at some of our favourite short films from previous years and gathered together a rather splendid collection all on the theme of winter. There are cake-bearing party waiter penguins, squirrels on sledges, polar bears crossing the icy wastes and several more films featuring lots and lots of snow…

Wrap up warm and head on down to this special cinematic celebration of the very short and the very cold!

19 Jan: Sat 1pm

Exhibition Tours: Lorna Macintyre and Margaret Salmon

#DCAgalleries

Interested in knowing more about the works on show? Then join our friendly Visitor Assistants for a guided tour of Margaret Salmon’s Hole *and Lorna Macintyre’s *Pieces of You Are Here.

13 Jan–6 Feb: Mon–Sun 11am & 3pm

Exhibition Tours: Lorna Macintyre and Margaret Salmon

A guided tour of Margaret Salmon’s Hole and Lorna Macintyre’s Pieces of You Are Here.

14 Jan–6 Feb: Mon–Sun 11am & 3pm

The Favourite

It may be a period drama, but in the hands of Yorgos Lanthimos (The Lobster, The Killing of a Sacred Deer) there’s nothing stuffy or staid about The Favourite. Don’t be fooled by the costumes or the castles, this is a saucy tragi-comedy about power, love and revenge. A perfect storm of court intrigue, personal tragedy and unconventional love triangle, this romp of a film has a decidedly dark edge.

"…this romp of a film has a decidedly dark edge." 

We first meet Queen Anne (Olivia Colman) in 1704, a couple of years into her reign, when the Duke of Marlborough has just won an important battle against the French during the War of Spanish Succession. This victory strengthens the hand of the Whigs against the landowning Tories, but also means Marlborough’s wife and Anne’s chief confidante, Sarah Churchill (a razor-sharp Rachel Weisz), has even more sway over the uncertain monarch in matters of public policy. Sarah is more than just a lady-in-waiting: her intimacy with the Queen is complex – both tender and deeply controlling. Entering into this volatile environment is Abigail Hill (a sparky Emma Stone), Sarah’s newly penniless cousin who quickly rises up the ranks and threatens to usurp her as the Queen’s ‘favourite’.

Colman is quite simply majestic as a monarch who is both needy and strong-willed, a woman whose life has been both cossetted and full of personal sadness. She more than matched by Weisz and Stone – watching these three actors at the top of their game is part of the sheer joy of The Favourite. Fans of Lanthimos’ uncompromising take on human foibles won’t be disappointed either: like the best Reformation comedies, this film has plenty to say about political machinations which are all too familiar today.

13 Jan–17 Jan: Mon 1–2.59pm, 3.30–5.29pm, 6–7.59pm & 8.30–10.29pm; Tue & Wed 1–2.59pm, 3.30–5.29pm & 8.30–10.29pm; Thu 1–2.59pm, 3.30–5.29pm & 8.45–10.44pm; Sun 8.30–10.29pm

Lorna MacIntyre: Pieces of you are here

The artist's first solo exhibition in a major UK institution, featuring new work specially commissioned for the gallery.

13 Dec 2018–24 Feb: Mon–Wed 10am–6pm; Thu 10am–8pm; Fri–Sun 10am–6pm

The Man with the Golden Gun

Ian Fleming set the climax of his novel Diamonds are Forever on RMS Queen Elizabeth. It is therefore rather ironic that the fire-ravaged wreck of the same ship, which was abandoned in Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbour, would provide one of the locations for the film of The Man with the Golden Gun.

"125 minutes of great fun."

Roger Moore’s second outing as Bond is perhaps best remembered for the late Christopher Lee’s charismatic performance as Scaramanga, the titular Man with the Golden Gun, but it has a good deal more to recommend it. There is Hervé Villechaize as Scaramanga’s diminutive side-kick, Nick Nack (the inspiration for Mini Me); Brit Ekland as Mary Goodnight, an endearingly accident prone Bond Girl; and the excellent final set piece in Scaramanga’s funhouse. Throw in plenty more exotic Asian locations, one truly awe-inspiring car stunt, and the bizarre sight of Roger Moore doing kung fu and you have 125 minutes of great fun. 

Our first collaboration with V"> is a cinematic celebration of Ocean Liners: Speed and Style, the first exhibition to fully explore the design and cultural impact of ocean liners on an international scale. We hope this eclectic mix of films will inspire you to explore how the movie industry chose to depict life on board – sometimes glamorous, sometimes dangerous – but always exciting. Ocean Liners: Speed and Style is the first in a series of major changing exhibitions at V">.

17 Jan: Thu 6pm

Margaret Salmon: Hole

New work from the Glasgow-based American artist and filmmaker.

20 Dec 2018–24 Feb: Mon–Wed 10am–6pm; Thu 10am–8pm; Fri–Sun 10am–6pm

Monsters and Men

When a black man is shot dead by police, three members of his community face serious consequences if they reveal their knowledge of the corruption behind his murder, in writer-director Reinaldo Marcus Green’s bracing feature debut.

"…puts a spotlight on a system of fear and misconduct that exists in America."

Set in a sun-dappled Bed-Stuy neighbourhood, we follow three characters affected by the tragedy. Life is good for Manny (Anthony Ramos), a young father who has just landed a new job as a security guard. But when a local man, Big D, is fatally shot while resisting arrest, it is Manny who captures the entire event on his cellphone. He feels morally obligated to share the video, despite knowing that doing so could threaten his family's wellbeing. NYPD officer Dennis (BlacKkKlansman’s John David Washington) is more than familiar with the fine line between police solidarity and corruption but grows increasingly unsettled by his colleagues' insistence that he support the party line when questions are asked about Big D's death. Meanwhile teenager Zyrick (Kelvin Harrison Jr), a high-school basketball prodigy, is drawn to a girl active in the campaign to bring crooked cops to justice. All three men have a lot to lose by getting involved, and maybe even more if they don’t.

Green's interwoven narrative puts a spotlight on a system of fear and misconduct that exists in America, while his filmmaking style implicates us, the audience, in its mirroring of police suspicion. Monsters and Men speaks to one of the most urgent issues of our time: one that affects us all, whether we choose to see it or not.

18 Jan–24 Jan: Fri 3.30–5.06pm & 8.30–10.06pm; Sat 4.15–5.51pm & 8.45–10.21pm; Sun 9–10.36pm; Mon & Tue 3.30–5.06pm & 8.30–10.06pm; Wed 3.30–5.06pm & 9–10.36pm; Thu 3.30–5.06pm & 8.30–10.06pm

Print Studio Tour

Take a tour of the DCA's print studio and view their state-of-the-art equipment for both traditional printing and creating digital artworks.

17 Jan–27 Apr: Thu 6.30–6.45pm; Sat noon–12.15pm

Relaxed: Discovery's Winter Shorts

Here at DCA we’re big fans of short films for all the family (that’s everyone from the smallest to the tallest) and our annual Discovery Film Festival presents a number of collections of shorts which prove popular year on year. They’re short in length, but big on quality. Usually we show them as part of that year’s collection and then release them back into the wild, never to be seen in Dundee again…

"Short in length, but big on quality…"

However, this year is slightly different. We’ve had a look back at some of our favourite short films from previous years and gathered together a rather splendid collection all on the theme of winter. There are cake-bearing party waiter penguins, squirrels on sledges, polar bears crossing the icy wastes and several more films featuring lots and lots of snow…

Wrap up warm and head on down to this special cinematic celebration of the very short and the very cold!

20 Jan: Sun 10.30am

Stan & Ollie

Stan Laurel (Coogan) and Oliver Hardy (Reilly) are touring postwar Britain in the hope of bankrolling their next picture, but their time seems to be passing. A classy, ambitious look at the gruelling nature of showbiz, weaving Laurel & Hardy’s routines into the fabric of the story; Coogan is particularly good and it’s a loving nod to two of cinema’s greats.

17 Jan: Thu 10.30am

Centre for Film Studies

Docs@The Byre: Donkeyote (Chico Pereira, 2017)

Don't miss Chico Pereira's award-winning, feel-good, festival favourite Donkeyote, which, along with special guests, launches the Docs@TheByre series on 6th February, 5pm at The Byre. (Free, but ticketed. Link coming soon!)

Docs@TheByre: Time Trial (Finlay Pretsell, 2018)

Join us at Byre on 27 March, 5pm for a thrilling and immersive journey into the race of a lifetime. You don't need to be a cycling fan to love this film. Free but ticketed, link to come.

Docs@TheByre: Piano to Zanskar (Michael Sulima, 2018)

Join us at The Byre on 24 April 5pm for a screening of audience favourite Piano to Zanskar along with a Q&A with the film's director, Michael Sulima and producer, Jarek Kotomski. Free but ticketed. Link to come.

Last Symposium Standing: Interdisciplinary Symposium on Survival Media

Since the early 2000s, a wide range of ‘survival’ media has been created, watched, played and explored. Alongside the rise in the production of survival media, this popularity is also evidenced by the prevalence of survival narratives in more traditionally established genres such as horror, disaster and thrillers. From reality […]

Docs@TheByre: Syrian Stories- Female Voice

Join us on 22 May 5pm at The Byre for a selection of short films featuring the perspectives and experiences of Syrian women filmmakers and discussisions about the politics of art and the art of politics. Free but ticketed. Link to come.

University of St Andrews

Gifford Lecture Series 2017 - A God to Contend With

The fifth lecture in the University's Gifford Lecture Series for 2017, this year to be given by Professor Michael Rea on the theme 'Though The Darkness Hide Thee: Seeking the Face of the Invisible God'. Over the course of six lectures, Professor Rea, Director of the Center for Philosophy of Religion at the University of Notre Dame in the USA, will take a theologically informed approach to the topic of 'divine hiddenness', the idea that God’s existence is far less evident — and that vivid, unambiguous experience of God’s presence is much less frequent — than one might expect from a perfectly loving deity. Philosophers often treat divine hiddenness as evidence that God doesn’t exist but, according to Professor Rea, that line of thinking is based on drawing parallels between divine love and human love. In his lectures, he will contend that it is not reasonable to believe that perfect, divine love would resemble human perceptions of ideal parental or romantic love.

Searching for a New Science

Oxford physicist Ard Louis and filmmaker David Malone meet famous scientists, philosophers and writers (including agnostics and people of faith such as Peter Atkins, Frans de Waal, Jane Goodall, Roger Penrose, Ben Okri, John Cottingham, George Ellis, Sunetra Gupta and others) to discuss questions about meaning and the nature of the universe in this premiere of a new film on the big questions of science and religion.

Films and Artefacts Series: Death on the Nile

Relax, nobody’s been murdered at MUSA, but museums do sometimes hold dangerous objects in their collections. Join Morna Annandale, Curatorial Trainee, to discover how museums deal with hazards lurking behind-the-scenes.

Films and Artefacts Series: Suffragette

The University of St Andrews played a leading part in developing women’s higher education in the 19th century. Watch the award-winning film, Suffragette, and find out about the ‘Lady Literate in Arts’ scheme and its legacy with MUSA's Exhibitions and Collections Curator.

Explorathon

Ever wondered how to make solar cells out of raspberries? Or how the dancin' has affected our social and cultural history? If so, join us for our largest ever celebration for European Researchers’ Night across Scotland as we fill the Byre Theatre with activities and live shows. Our third extravaganza of discovery, debate and entertainment takes place in Aberdeen, Glasgow, Edinburgh and St Andrews.