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Case Study: Luke Campbell

Personal details
Degree:Computational Science Profile picture
School(s): School of Computer Science
Year of Graduation:Jun-1995
LinkedIn:https://www.linkedin.com/in/lukecampbell1
National of: United Kingdom
Employment details
Organisation: Planet Software Limited, Douglas, Isle of Man
Job title: Java Developer
Occupational Sector: IT/Computer Programming
What has been your route to getting your current position?
I've had a fairly varied career. I started off working for a Scottish Software House, and moved on to working for one of Scotland's best known web design agencies. From there, I spent a few years being an IT Contractor, I then worked for 6 and a half years for PokerStars. Currently, I'm now working for a company that provides APIs and Internet services to Vets.
What does your job involve ?
I'm designing, building, supporting and improving on REST based APIs using https://swagger.io. It involves dealing with external and internal customers alike, and it's a lot of fun!
What are the best bits of your job ?
Using swagger.io is great fun. It's not an exaggeration to say that it's changed the way that I look at things, and I love the fact that I'm able to add new functionality quickly and simply, with the documentation that's automatically up to date with the software!
Why were you successful?
It's certainly worth attending as many events as you possibly can, particularly networking events. I'd suggest also, if time allows, that you aim to become a contributor to some open source projects, and it's also an excellent way of making a difference and improving your skill set.
What skills/ knowledge from your degree have you found particularly helpful in this role?
I'd say that, in general, my approach to development has been shaped by my education in my degree - there isn't one particular area!
What advice would you give to students wishing to follow the same path?
Finding a workplace that's fun, friendly and encourages good team work is of vital importance. You can make the difference, and I believe that teams that socialise together are much more likely to succeed when the chips are down.