Clinical and molecular biological study of respiratory infection

Group leader: Stephen Gillespie

Sir James Black Chair of Medicine

Research overview

Stephen Gillespie has worked in Kenya researching the relationship between malaria and lower respiratory tract infection and the prevalence of parasitic infection in children in Kilifi, Kenya. He has investigated a cholera epidemic and vaccine failures in Guerrero, Mexico. He has been working in collaboration with colleagues at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre since 1988 where he has, variously, studied respiratory and parasite diagnostics and novel antimalarials, anti-helminthics and anti tuberculosis agents. His main research activity is in the area of tuberculosis drug development.

For the last twenty five years Stephen Gillespie has been involved in various aspects of  tuberculosis diagnosis and drug development. This has included the evaluation of new candidate antituberculosis agents in vitro. This work has expanded into studies of the molecular mechanisms of resistance and the development of model systems to measure the fitness deficits found in resistant strains. He has been involved in the development of fluoroquinolones for tuberculosis having performed early bacterial activity studies and clinical trials of ciprofloxacin. More recently he has led the group working on the clinical development of moxifloxacin in collaboration with the Global Alliance for TB Drug Development as Chief Investigator of the REMox TB study. He later went on to be the coordinating investigator for the TB Alliance STAND trial (Shortening Treatment by Advancing New Drugs). He is also one of the Chief Investigators of the PanACEA consortium that links European and African research groups in enhancing anti-tuberculosis therapy.  

He has an extensive record of developing novel mirobiological diagnostics.  Most recently, he has developed SLIC (Scattered Light Integrating Collector),  which performs phenotypic antibiotic susceptibility testing in less than 30 minutes. This innovation recently won a Longitude Prize Discovery Award. In addition he has developed the Molecular Bacterial Load Assay, an innovative way of detecting, quantifiying and determining the viability of bacteria in a single test that allows both diagnosis and the monitoring of treatment response.

Publications

Murphy, ME, Wills, GH, Murthy, S, Louw, C, Bateson, ALC, Hunt, RD, McHugh, TD, Nunn, AJ, Meredith, SK, Mendel, CM, Spigelman, M, Crook, AM, Gillespie, SH & REMoxTB Consortium 2018, 'Gender differences in tuberculosis treatment outcomes: a post hoc analysis of the REMoxTB study' BMC Medicine, vol. 16, 189. DOI: 10.1186/s12916-018-1169-5
Ahmed, MIM, Ntinginya, NE, Kibiki, G, Mtafya, BA, Semvua, H, Mpagama, S, Mtabho, C, Saathoff, E, Held, K, Loose, R, Kroidl, I, Chachage, M, Both, UV, Haule, A, Mekota, A-M, Boeree, MJ, Gillespie, SH, Hoelscher, M, Heinrich, N, Geldmacher, C & Pan African Consortium for the Evaluation of Antituberculosis Antibiotics (PanACEA) 2018, 'Phenotypic changes on Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific CD4 T cells as surrogate markers for tuberculosis treatment efficacy' Frontiers in Immunology, vol. 9, 2247. DOI: 10.3389/fimmu.2018.02247
Tweed, CD, Crook, AM, Amukoye, EI, Dawson, R, Diacon, AH, Hanekom, M, McHugh, TD, Mendel, CM, Meredith, SK, Murphy, ME, Murthy, SE, Nunn, AJ, Phillips, PPJ, Singh, KP, Spigelman, M, Wills, GH & Gillespie, SH 2018, 'Toxicity associated with tuberculosis chemotherapy in the REMoxTB study' BMC Infectious Diseases, vol. 18, 317. DOI: 10.1186/s12879-018-3230-6

Overview

Overview header image

Scientists associated with the thirty-two research groups that are affiliated with the Biomedical Sciences Research Complex perform highly innovative, multi-disciplinary research in eleven broad areas of biomedical research, employing state-of-the-art techniques to address key questions at the leading edge of the biomedical and biological sciences. The BSRC is grateful for funding from all funding agencies including the Institutional Strategic Support Fund from the Wellcome Trust.

Follow the links on the left to view individual research groups associated with one or more of the eleven BSRC research areas.

Research areas

Scientists associated with the thirty-two research groups that are affiliated with the Biomedical Sciences Research Complex perform highly innovative, multi-disciplinary research in eleven broad areas of biomedical research, employing state-of-the-art techniques to address key questions at the leading edge of the biomedical and biological sciences.

Follow the links on the left to view individual research groups associated with one or more of the eleven BSRC research areas.

Research by academic schools

Research in the BSRC is conducted by thirty-two independent research groups based in the Schools of Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy, and Medicine. Follow the links on the left to view groups associated with each school.