Mode of action and application of novel antimicrobials

Group leader: Peter Coote

Lecturer

Research overview

Antifungals: understanding mode of action and resistance Food spoilage and human infection due to growth of fungi are serious global problems. Furthermore, the problems are exacerbated by increasing resistance to the few antifungal compounds currently available. Thus, there is a need to develop novel approaches to target these organisms. We are studying two different groups of antifungal compounds; organic acid preservatives, which are used in manufactured foods and beverages to prevent yeast spoilage; and, antifungal peptides, for example, ranalexin and dermaseptin, which are produced as part of the innate immune system of amphibian skin. In the lab, we are using modern functional genomics techniques, including proteomics, DNA microarrays and a library of deletion strains representing the entire yeast genome to obtain fundamental understanding of, the mode of action of the above compounds, and inducible mechanisms of resistance. More specifically, we are aiming to identify changes in global gene/protein expression occurring in response to exposure to these compounds and subsequently identify the role these genes play in either the mode of action or conferring resistance. We are also attempting to characterise which regulatory and signalling proteins detect, transmit and alter gene expression in response to exposure to these compounds.

Publications

Overview

Overview header image

Scientists associated with the thirty-two research groups that are affiliated with the Biomedical Sciences Research Complex perform highly innovative, multi-disciplinary research in eleven broad areas of biomedical research, employing state-of-the-art techniques to address key questions at the leading edge of the biomedical and biological sciences. The BSRC is grateful for funding from all funding agencies including the Institutional Strategic Support Fund from the Wellcome Trust.

Follow the links on the left to view individual research groups associated with one or more of the eleven BSRC research areas.

Research areas

Scientists associated with the thirty-two research groups that are affiliated with the Biomedical Sciences Research Complex perform highly innovative, multi-disciplinary research in eleven broad areas of biomedical research, employing state-of-the-art techniques to address key questions at the leading edge of the biomedical and biological sciences.

Follow the links on the left to view individual research groups associated with one or more of the eleven BSRC research areas.

Research by academic schools

Research in the BSRC is conducted by thirty-two independent research groups based in the Schools of Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy, and Medicine. Follow the links on the left to view groups associated with each school.