Biological EPR spectroscopy: protein & oligonucleotide complex structure, function & dynamics

Group leader: Olav Schiemann

Research overview

We are interested in the structure/function relationship and metal ion dependent folding of complex biomacromolecules. These include catalytically active RNAs (ribozymes), functional protein-protein and protein-DNA complexes as well as DNA-based nanomaterials. The central method in our biophysical research is multi-frequency continuous wave (cw) and especially pulsed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. To test the applicability and limitations of new EPR-techniques we also synthesize suitable organic/inorganic model systems.

Related links

Research group website

Publications

Ward, RJ & Schiemann, O 2013, ' Interspin Distance Determination by EPR '. in G Roberts (ed.), Encyclopedia of Biophysics. Springer, pp. 1116-1123.
Reginsson, GW & Schiemann, O 2013, ' Spin Labeling of DNA and RNA '. in G Roberts (ed.), Encyclopedia of Biophysics. Springer, pp. 2429-2431.
Reginsson, GW, Kunjir, NC, Sigurdsson, ST & Schiemann, O 2012, ' Trityl radicals: spin labels for nanometer-distance measurements ' Chemistry - A European Journal , vol 18, no. 43, pp. 13580-13584.

Overview

Scientists associated with the thirty-two research groups that are affiliated with the Biomedical Sciences Research Complex perform highly innovative, multi-disciplinary research in eleven broad areas of biomedical research, employing state-of-the-art techniques to address key questions at the leading edge of the biomedical and biological sciences.

Follow the links on the left to view individual research groups associated with one or more of the eleven BSRC research areas.

Research areas

Scientists associated with the thirty-two research groups that are affiliated with the Biomedical Sciences Research Complex perform highly innovative, multi-disciplinary research in eleven broad areas of biomedical research, employing state-of-the-art techniques to address key questions at the leading edge of the biomedical and biological sciences.

Follow the links on the left to view individual research groups associated with one or more of the eleven BSRC research areas.

Research by academic schools

Research in the BSRC is conducted by thirty-two independent research groups based in the Schools of Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy, and Medicine. Follow the links on the left to view groups associated with each school.