Measuring nanometre distances for structural biology using EPR spectroscopy.

Group leader: Janet Lovett

Royal Society University Research Fellow

Research overview

Measuring nanometre distances for structural biology using EPR spectroscopy.

I use Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to measure nanometre distances in proteins and nucleic acids. This provides detail on their structure and dynamics. The methodology is applied to a range of proteins including those for protein excretion in the cell. I am also interested in developing the methods for tagging proteins and nucleic acids to make them suitable for this kind of investigation, as well as advancing the EPR experiments themselves.

The biological preparation and EPR facilities at St Andrews are outstanding with, among others, pulsed and CW X-band, high power Q-band and the home-built high power W-band (HiPER).

Publications

Corey, R, Ahdash, Z, Shah, A, Pyle, E, Allen, W, Fessl, T, Lovett, JE, Politis, A & Collinson, I 2019, 'ATP-induced asymmetric pre-protein folding as a driver of protein translocation through the Sec machinery' eLife, vol. 8, e41803. https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.41803
Bowen, AM, Johnson, EOD, Mercuri, F, Hoskins, NJ, Qiao, R, McCullagh, JSO, Lovett, JE, Bell, SG, Zhou, W, Timmel, CR, Wong, LL & Harmer, JR 2018, 'A structural model of a P450-ferredoxin complex from orientation-selective double electron-electron resonance spectroscopy' Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 140, no. 7, pp. 2514-2527. https://doi.org/10.1021/jacs.7b11056

Overview

Overview header image

Scientists associated with the thirty-two research groups that are affiliated with the Biomedical Sciences Research Complex perform highly innovative, multi-disciplinary research in eleven broad areas of biomedical research, employing state-of-the-art techniques to address key questions at the leading edge of the biomedical and biological sciences. The BSRC is grateful for funding from all funding agencies including the Institutional Strategic Support Fund from the Wellcome Trust.

Follow the links on the left to view individual research groups associated with one or more of the eleven BSRC research areas.

Research areas

Scientists associated with the thirty-two research groups that are affiliated with the Biomedical Sciences Research Complex perform highly innovative, multi-disciplinary research in eleven broad areas of biomedical research, employing state-of-the-art techniques to address key questions at the leading edge of the biomedical and biological sciences.

Follow the links on the left to view individual research groups associated with one or more of the eleven BSRC research areas.

Research by academic schools

Research in the BSRC is conducted by thirty-two independent research groups based in the Schools of Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy, and Medicine. Follow the links on the left to view groups associated with each school.