Systems chemistry

Group leader: Douglas Philp

Research overview

Self-Assembly and Self-Replication Processes.


Molecular recognition plays a pivotal role in chemical and biological systems. Processes such as enzyme catalysis or signal transduction in cells depend on non-covalent interactions for their correct operation. Our Research Group is concerned with the study of non-covalent interactions at a fundamental level and the application of this knowledge in the transfer of concepts from biology to chemistry. We are interested in developing synthetic routes to complex mesomolecular systems through the programmed application of a fundamental understanding of non-covalent interactions in self-assembly and self-replication processes. Our research involves the interplay of experimental and computational methods - including synthetic chemistry, NMR spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations - for the design and construction of these systems. In particular, we have developed minimal and reciprocal synthetic replicating systems that are capable of information storage and transfer.

Related links

Research group website

Publications

Joannesse, C, Johnston, CP, Morrill, LC, Woods, PA, Kieffer, M, Nigst, TA, Mayr, H , Lebl, T , Philp, D , Bragg, RA & Smith, AD 2012, ' Isothiourea-Mediated Asymmetric O- to C-Carboxyl Transfer of Oxazolyl Carbonates: Structure-Selectivity Profiles and Mechanistic Studies ' Chemistry - A European Journal , vol 18, no. 8, pp. 2398-2408.
Hassan, NI , del Amo, V , Calder, E & Philp, D 2011, ' Low Temperature Capture of Pseudorotaxanes ' Organic Letters , vol 13, no. 3, pp. 458-461.
Del Amo, V & Philp, D 2010, ' Integrating Replication-Based Selection Strategies in Dynamic Covalent Systems ' Chemistry - A European Journal , vol 16, no. 45, pp. 13304-13318.

Overview

Scientists associated with the thirty-two research groups that are affiliated with the Biomedical Sciences Research Complex perform highly innovative, multi-disciplinary research in eleven broad areas of biomedical research, employing state-of-the-art techniques to address key questions at the leading edge of the biomedical and biological sciences.

Follow the links on the left to view individual research groups associated with one or more of the eleven BSRC research areas.

Research areas

Scientists associated with the thirty-two research groups that are affiliated with the Biomedical Sciences Research Complex perform highly innovative, multi-disciplinary research in eleven broad areas of biomedical research, employing state-of-the-art techniques to address key questions at the leading edge of the biomedical and biological sciences.

Follow the links on the left to view individual research groups associated with one or more of the eleven BSRC research areas.

Research by academic schools

Research in the BSRC is conducted by thirty-two independent research groups based in the Schools of Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy, and Medicine. Follow the links on the left to view groups associated with each school.