Mike Oram's Personal Home Page

School of Psychology & Neuroscience, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 9JP, Scotland

Email: mwo@st-andrews.ac.uk      Tel:   01334 462062     Fax: 01334 463042

DISCLAIMER: The information found and the views expressed in my personal home pages are not the responsibility of the University of St Andrews nor do they reflect institutional policy

Research (inc. opportunities & publications)  Teaching (St Andrews login required)

Employment    Qualifications    Grants     Other

School of Psychology & Neuroscience (New window)     St. Andrews University (New window)   ANC, Edinburgh (New window)


I am a lecturer in the School of Psychology & Neuroscience at the University of St. Andrews and an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Edinburgh (Institute of Adaptive and Neural Computation).

Overview of research

My research programme relates to visual information processing and the computations underlying perception and cognition. Understanding the computations underlying vision requires precise knowledge of how visual information is encoded in single neurones and across populations of neurones. Given that the neuronal code is used to transmit the information, this strand of my research programme can be likened to trying to understand the language of the brain. While it is necessary to determine the structure of the “language of the brain”, it is also necessary to know what factors influence the encoded information. The goal of my research programme is to relate detailed description of the encoded information to behaviour. As of August 2012, over 50 publications have been output including 39 peer reviewed journal articles (cited >2500 times, h-index = 22).

This programme has far reaching consequences for our understanding the computations underlying perception and cognition. Perceptual and cognitive processes are derived from studies measuring behaviour under carefully controlled experimental studies. There is growing evidence that many of the behaviours used to infer such psychological processes can also be predicted directly from sensory information encoded in neuronal representations without the need to postulate the current plethora of perceptual and cognitive processes. My research utilises a range of techniques aimed at bringing together ideas, data and models from neuroscience, psychophysics and cognitive psychology. The results help build toward a common conceptual framework allowing fruitful study of behaviour across this wide range of approaches and levels.

In pursuit of this research programme I apply information theoretic and modelling techniques to neurophysiological and behavioural data. (Oram & Perrett 1994; Oram & Foldiak 1996; Perrett & Oram 1998; Oram & MacLeod 2001; Oram, under revision; Williams & Oram, under revision; Oram, in prep; Oram & Jentzsch, in submission). For example, the development of novel analysis and modelling methods allows examination of the information content, including the associated changes over time, of neurophysiological data (Oram & Perrett 1992, 1994, 1996; Oram et al 1999; Oram et al 2002, Barraclough et al. 2005; Barraclough et al. 2006; van Rossum et al, 2008; Oram, 2010; Endres & Oram, 2010; Endres et al, 2010; Oram, 2011; Cortes et al in press; Oram & Jentszch, in submission). Examples of the value of this integrated approach are available here.

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Employment

Position

Research Center

Dates

Lecturer

School of Psychology, St Andrews University,St Andrews, Fife, UK

1999 present

Fogerty International Research Fellow

Laboratory of Neuroscience, National Institutes of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

1996 1999

Research Assistant

School of Psychology & Neuroscience, St. Andrews University, St Andrews, Fife, UK

1988 1996

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Qualifications

Degree

Title

University

Dates

B. Sc.

Zoology

Bristol University

1982 1986

M. Sc.

Biological Computation

York University

1987 1988

Ph.D.

The neurophysiology of form and motion processing in the temporal lobe of the macaque monkey

St. Andrews University

1992 1996

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Grants

Source

Date

Value

ESRC AQMeN (Total grant £1.3M) 2009-2012 £17,000

SRIF3 (Lead applicant)

2006

249,000

EU Framework (Collaborator with Dave Perrett)

2002-2005

140,000

Forgerty International Research Fellowship

1996-1999

£60,000

Grindley Grant

1996

250

Guarantors of Brain travel grant

1996

500

The Royal Society of London travel grant

1996

416

Guarantors of Brain travel grant

1994

500

MRC: "Recognition of objects and their motion"

1994

92,000

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Other
Invited speaker, Spatio-temporal Patterns and Synfire Chains workshop, Newcastle 2008
Invited speaker, 7th International Neural Coding Meeting, Montevideo, Uruguay 2007
Honorary Research Fellowship, Institute of Adaptive & Neural Computation, Edinburgh, UK 2007 present

Invited speaker, 6th International Neural Coding Workshop, Marburg, Germany

2005

Invited article, Network – Computation in Neural Systems

2005

MRC Research Training Referee Panel member 2004 present

Invited speaker, Early Cognitive Vision Workshop, Isle of Skye, UK

2004

Invited speaker, 5th International Workshop on Neural Coding, Aulla, Italy

2003

Invited participant, Neuroecology and the visual brain, Newcastle

2002

Invited speaker, Royal Society of London

2001

Invited participant, Novartis Foundation discussion meeting

2001

Invited participant, MRC/EPSRC strategy meeting

2001

Invited News & Views article for Nature Neuroscience

1999

Invited article, TINS

1998

Invited article, Neural Networks

1994

External PhD examiner: UCL (1999)

Internal PhD examiner: 2002, 2*2003, 2004, 2005

Grant reviewer: MRC, BBSRC, EPSRC, ESRC, Wellcome Trust

Reviewer for: Nature, Science, Proc R Soc, TINS, J Neurosci, J Neurophysiol, Euro J Neurosci, Exp Brain Res, Neuropsychologia, J Comp Neurosci, Network, Psych Bull Rev

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