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Guidance on the transportation of hazardous substances

Guidance

Guidance on the transportation of hazardous substances

Index

 

  1. Introduction
  2. Use of private vehicles for transport
  3. Transport of hazardous substances within the UK
  4. Transport of hazardous substances overseas
  5. References
  6. Appendix 1 - Transport Emergency Card (Transport_emergency_card (RTF, 10 KB) can be downloaded)

 

Introduction

There are several sets of regulations covering aspects of the transport of hazardous substances (see references).

 

This guidance describes the general requirements of legislation with respect to the transportation of hazardous materials. Where the transport of specific substances is regulated by specific legislation, the requirements of that legislation must be complied with (e.g. transport of radioactive substances).

 

Use of private vehicles for transport

Private vehicles should not normally be used to transport hazardous substances. Any person intending to transport hazardous substances by private vehicle should seek advice from the University Safety Adviser

 

Transport of hazardous substances within the UK.

Only competent and appropriately registered carriers should be used to transport hazardous substances.

 

Once a contractor has been selected, it is then necessary to identify the chemical according to its UN number (the International System for Identifying Hazardous Substances), classify the chemical according to hazard and the appropriate packaging group has to be determined. The Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road (Classification, Packaging, Labelling and Provision of Information) Regulations 1996 (CDG-CPL Regulations) classifies hazardous substances as follows:

 

  • 1 Explosive
  • 2.1 Flammable Gas
  • 2.2 Non-Flammable gas
  • 2.3 Toxic Gas
  • 3 Flammable Liquid
  • 4.1 Flammable Solid
  • 4.2 Solid liable to spontaneously combust
  • 4.3 Solid which will react with water to produce a flammable gas
  • 5.1 Oxidizing compounds except Organic Peroxides
  • 5.2 Organic Peroxides
  • 6.1 Toxic Substance
  • 6.2 Infectious Agent
  • 7 Radioactive Substance
  • 8 Corrosive Substance
  • 9 Miscellaneous Hazardous Substance

The UN number of the chemical and its hazard classification can be obtained from the HSE publication entitled 'Approved Carriage List'. A copy of this document is available for viewing at Environmental, Health and Safety Services.

 

Once the hazardous substance has been classified it should be packaged according to its 'Packaging Group' (see 'Approved Carriage List'). All packaging should be secure and ensure that the hazardous substance cannot escape, leak or cause any other type of risk to health and safety when exposed to normal stresses and strains of transport. The type of packaging will depend on the container that the substance is in (e.g. glass bottle or plastic container) and the hazard of the substance (e.g. explosive, corrosive or category of the infectious agent). Details on the type of packaging required is given in the HSE publication entitled 'Approved Requirements and Test Methods for the Classification and Packaging of Dangerous Goods for Carriage'. A copy of this guidance is available for view at Environmental, Health and Safety Services.

 

To comply with the Chemicals (Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply) Regulations 1994 the container for the hazardous substance should be appropriately labelled and an appropriate Materials Safety Data Sheet supplied (see relevant section of this guidance).

 

The package(s) must be appropriately labelled. Transport hazard labels are slightly different from those required for the Chemicals (Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply) Regulations 1994 (CHIP). Transport labels are diamond in shape and have different coloured backgrounds according to the hazard. Each diamond includes a pictogram describing the hazard, written details of the hazard and should include the transport classification number. Examples are shown below.

 

 

 

When transporting any hazardous substance, the carrier should have a Transport Emergency Card (TREMCARD) inside the vehicle. The TREMCARD should detail the substances being carried, its hazard(s) and what actions should be taken in the event of an emergency. It should also contain a contact name and telephone number that the emergency services can contact in the event of an accident. This TREMCARD should be visible in the vehicle at all times when transporting hazardous substances. An example of a TREMCARD is given in Appendix 1. Once the load has been delivered, the TREMCARD should be removed from view.

 

Above specific threshold limits, the Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road Regulations 1996 requires an orange plate fixed to the front and rear of a vehicle carrying dangerous goods. These quantities are given in the HSE publication entitled 'Carriage of Dangerous Goods Explained Part 2 - Guidance for Road Vehicle Operators and Others Involved in the Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road'. A copy of this guidance is available for view at Environmental Health and Safety Services.

 

Records of all shipments of hazardous substances should be kept.

 

Transport of hazardous substances overseas.

 

When transporting hazardous substances overseas, it is vital that only a competent and appropriately registered carrier is used. The carrier should be aware of the International agreements on the movement of hazardous substances as well as the legal requirements in the relevant countries. Written evidence to show that the company is competent should be obtained before it is used.

 

There are many different International agreements on the movement of hazardous substances e.g. the ADR agreement on the movement by road. Care should be taken that the substance, packaging and labelling of the goods conforms to these agreements.

 

Advice on the transport of hazardous substances within the UK and overseas should be sought from the University Safety Adviser prior to shipment.

 

 

References

 

1. Guidance for Consignors of Dangerous Goods by Road and Rail (Classification, Packaging, Labelling and Provision of Information) Regulations 1996. (Book Number - HS(G)160). Published by HSE Books. ISBN: 0 7176 1255 4 (1996)

 

2. Guidance for Road Vehicle Operators and Others Involved in the Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road. (Book Number - HS(G)161). Published by HSE Books. ISBN: 0 7176 1253 8. (1996).

 

3. Approved Carriage List (Third Edition). Information approved for the carriage of dangerous goods by road and rail other than explosives and radioactive material. (Book Number - L90). Published by HSE Books. ISBN 0 7176 1681 9 (1999).

 

4. Approved Requirements and Test Methods for the Classification and packaging of Dangerous Goods for Carriage. (Book Number - L88). Published by HSE Books. ISBN: 0 7176 1221 X (1996).

 

 

Appendix 1

(Transport_emergency_card (RTF, 10 KB) can be downloaded)

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University of St. Andrews

Transport Emergency Card

(To be completed by the Consignor)

 

Cargo:

 

 

 

Nature of Hazard(s):

 

 

 

Protective Devices:

 

 

 

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Emergency Action

 

Stop the engine No naked lights. No Smoking. Warn other road users. Keep the public away from the danger areas. Put on protective clothing if appropriate.

 

Spillage

 

Contain the leaking liquid with absorbent material e.g. dry sand. Prevent liquid entering the sewers or basements as vapour may create a toxic atmosphere.

 

Fire

 

If safe to do so - attack fire with a dry powder fire extinguisher.

 

First-Aid

 

If substance has got into the eyes - immediately wash out for several minutes. Remove contaminated clothing immediately and wash affected skin with plenty of water. Seek medical treatment when anyone has symptoms apparently due to inhalation, swallowing, contact with skin or eyes, or fumes produced in a fire. Even if there are no symptoms, send to a doctor and show him this.

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Additional Information Provided by Consignor (e.g. Contact Name in the event of an emergency)

 

 

 

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Telephone

 

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Warning: This information is intended to assist any person involved in recognising the characteristics of this load. It is emphasised that such substances may vary according to conditions; this information, therefore, must be regarded as a general guide

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Transport_emergency_card (RTF, 10 KB)

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