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Photo of the week

It's Fife Jim, but not as we know it!

Friday 25 January 2013

Within the experimental system, light beam is converted into a pulling device, that gathers micro-objects just like when using a chain.

Within the experimental system, light beam is converted into a pulling device, that gathers micro-objects just like when using a chain.

A researcher from St Andrews has helped make science fiction a reality by creating a real-life “tractor” beam, as featured in Star Trek.

Dr Tomas Cizmar,  Research Fellow in the School of Medicine, with colleagues from the Institute of Scientific Instruments (ISI) in the Czech Republic have, for the first time used a beam of light to attract objects.

In the US science fiction show, the “tractor” beam could be used to move spaceships, however, this version is at a microscopic level and could have potential uses in medicine such as when testing or treating blood.

The team, led by Dr Cizmar, with Dr Oto Brzobohaty and Professor Pavel Zemanek, both of ISI, discovered the new technique which will allow them to provide 'negative' force acting upon minuscule particles.

Photo of the week

It's Fife Jim, but not as we know it!

Friday 25 January 2013

Within the experimental system, light beam is converted into a pulling device, that gathers micro-objects just like when using a chain.

Within the experimental system, light beam is converted into a pulling device, that gathers micro-objects just like when using a chain.

A researcher from St Andrews has helped make science fiction a reality by creating a real-life “tractor” beam, as featured in Star Trek.

Dr Tomas Cizmar,  Research Fellow in the School of Medicine, with colleagues from the Institute of Scientific Instruments (ISI) in the Czech Republic have, for the first time used a beam of light to attract objects.

In the US science fiction show, the “tractor” beam could be used to move spaceships, however, this version is at a microscopic level and could have potential uses in medicine such as when testing or treating blood.

The team, led by Dr Cizmar, with Dr Oto Brzobohaty and Professor Pavel Zemanek, both of ISI, discovered the new technique which will allow them to provide 'negative' force acting upon minuscule particles.