Teaching Modules

Amerindian Studies Modules

SA 5201 - AMERINDIAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

Credits: 30
Semester: Whole year

Description: This course introduces students to different forms of oral and written expression in Amerindian Societies. The course also prepares students to confront problems of linguistic and textual interpretation, as well as introducing them to more recent issues in intercultural and literacy studies. Themes to be considered include: linguistic and cultural history; testimonies, sources and indigenous writings; orality, performance and literacy; writing systems, histories and historicities; concepts of temporality and the spatialization of memory.

Class Hour: To be arranged.
Teaching: Four hours a week [lectures, seminars, supervision]
Assessment: Continuous Assessment = 100%.

SA 5202 - AMERINDIAN HISTORY AND ETHNOGRAPHY

Credits: 30
Semester: 2

Description: This course examines the South American continent in time and space, with emphasis on the evidential and methodological bases of specialized and comparative knowledge. Using sample texts and sources, it introduces students to the problems of interpreting information collected in "the field" and in "the archive", as well as preparing them to explore the published and unpublished sources on the region. Themes to be considered include: social organization and political structures; cosmology, myth and ritual; religious conversion; sacred geographies, cultural ecologies and climate change; technology; agropastoral and mining systems; population movements, migration and mestizaje.

Class Hour: To be arranged.
Teaching: Four hours a week [lectures, seminars, supervision]
Assessment: Continuous Assessment = 100%.

SA 5203 - SPECIAL SUBJECT (AMERINDIAN STUDIES)

Credits: 30
Semester: Whole year

Description: This is chosen in discussion with the supervisor, and is available for students with a well-thought-out and specific research interest in a particular topic. It can substitute for one of the preceding two modules.

Social Anthropology Modules

SA5010 - RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

Credits: 30
Semester: 1

Description: This module aims to do three things—i) introduce students to the philosophies of social scientific research as particular practices; ii) introduce students to the range of research methodologies which pertain particularly to social and cultural anthropology; iii) lay the foundations for students progressing to higher research degrees, in particular the Ph.D.

Class Hour: To be arranged.
Teaching: Four hours a week [lectures, seminars, supervision]
Assessment: Continuous Assessment = 100%.

SA5011 - THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF CONNECTIONS: INTERDISCIPLINARITY AS METHODOLOGY

Credits: 30
Semester: 2

Description: This module builds on SA5010 by examining the relevance of other disciplines for Social Anthropology. Through lectures and seminars, students are shown how Anthropology can be extended and illuminated by working with methodologies and concepts drawn from History, Social Science, Philosophy, Language and the Arts. It shows how anthropologists must invoke other specialist disciplines during their work. It invites students to think of societies and anthropological theories as informed by internal and external constraints, dialogues and reinterpretations, which unfold in time. It will show the role of anthropology in articulating different disciplines.

Class Hour: To be arranged.
Teaching: Four hours a week [lectures, seminars, supervision]
Assessment: Continuous Assessment = 100%.

Optional Social Anthropology Modules

(All optional modules are dependent on staff available in any year to teach them, and may not be offered every year.)

SA5001 (Optional) - THEORY AND METHOD IN SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

Credits: 30
Semester: Whole Year

Description: The module will cover classical social theory and key concepts in social thought. It will review the basic assumptions and methodological implications of a variety of theoretical perspectives (ranging from structural-functionalism to postmodernism), and will examine in detail the logic of different modes of explanation. The paradigmatic positions of key social thinkers will also be considered.

Class Hour: To be arranged.
Teaching: Two Hours (seminar, lectures, or tutorials).
Assessment: 3 Hour Examination = 100%

SA5002 (Optional) - CURRENT ISSUES IN SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

Credits: 30
Semester: Whole Year

Description: The module focuses on recent developments within the discipline, and aims to challenge the student's existing presumptions and preoccupations. It will cover both theoretical and substantive issues. Focus will lie with the most up-to-date areas of anthropological inquiry and contention; but also students will be lead to engage with crucial turning-point debates in history of the discipline. Most particularly, the Writing Culture debates of the late 1980s that has been so influential in present anthropological theory and ethnographic writing.

Class Hour: To be arranged.
Teaching: Two Hours (seminar, lectures, or tutorials).
Assessment: 3 Hour Examination = 100%

SA5003 (Optional) - SOCIAL ORGANISATION AND CULTURE

Credits: 30
Semester: Whole Year

Description: The module discusses the description of human society and culture, focusing on both theoretical and empirical issues by reference to selected ethnographic material. It will consider such matters as relativism, deconstructionism and the modelling of social forms and, at a more specific level, the main concepts for describing the institutional features of the full variety of human societies.

Class Hour: To be arranged.
Teaching: Two Hours (seminar, lectures, or tutorials).
Assessment: 3 Hour Examination = 100%

Dissertation

SA5099 - DISSERTATION

Credits: 60
Prerequisite: M.Res. Social Anthropology — SA5010, SA5011 to an average grade of 13.5 or above.

Description: Dissertations will normally be supervised by members of the Amerindian teaching staff who will advise on the choice of subject and provide guidance throughout the research process. The completed dissertation of not more than 15,000 words must be submitted by the end of August. Dissertations can be submitted as a Research Proposal for PhD, after consultation with supervisor. Any envisaged fieldwork needs to comply with university and departmental regulations on risk assessment, safety and ethics [a departmental ethics form needs to be filled out and approved before any research is carried out].

Class Hour: At times to be arranged with the supervisor
Teaching: Individual Supervision
Assessment: Dissertation = 100%

For further information, please contact:

Centre for Amerindian, Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Department of Social Anthropology
School of Philosophical, Anthropological & Film Studies
University of St Andrews
71 North Street
St Andrews, Fife
KY16 9AL Scotland, UK

Email: amerindian@st-andrews.ac.uk
Phone: +44 (0)1334 462986/2977

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